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Pennsylvania License Plate Images

John McDevitt and Jordan Irazabal

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Archived news and postings from 2022

10/9/2022 Posting

Here are two recent Passenger highs which were spotted by Matt Ciecka.

 

 

 


Here is a new high PA Choose Life plate thanks to Chris Wentzel.  It is also the first plate from that series with the map outline.  The previous high was 01388C/L which was without the sticker well.  This plate series dates back to 2007.

 

 


Another new high American Cancer Society plate thanks to Richard Than.  Like the plate above it is also the first series plate with the map outline.  The previous high was 00146C/S which was with the sticker well.  This plate series dates back to 2009.

 

 


This U.S. Marine Corps Veteran plate photo represents a new high.  Thank you to Bruce Bufalini.

 

 

 


Here is a new high U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, and the first one documented with the map outline.  The previous high was 00120A/X.  The photo was taken at a tough angle, but all of the important features were captured, thanks to Mike Alfonse.

 

 


It may be hard to believe, but plates on the www base are still being issued.  St. Vincent Alumni Association choose not to switch to the graphic base.  The warehouse report also shows that plates up to S/V01599 are still on inventory waiting to be sold.  Thanks to Bruce Bufalini for the photo.

 


Here is another new high, this one being an Official Use PennDOT Passenger Vehicle plate.  Truck or commercial vehicles use P/A0000T as the serial format.  This photo is thanks to Richard Than.

 

 


See this personalized Person with Disability plate as well as this week's display of personalized and vanity plates.

 

 

 

 

 


This is a very nice 1925 Bus plate thanks to Jeff Lesher.  The first character is the letter "O".  There was another class of Bus plates between 1926 and 1929 using the letter "H" as the identifying prefix.  Presumably the "O" stood for Omnibus, while the "H" stood for Hire, but these are a source of some confusion.

 


This is a low number 3-digit 1935 Passenger plate, and came from an old Clayton Moore post.  At that time, the initial series of plates ran from 1 to 99999 before using a number of alpha-numeric combination.  This plate and others up to 4 characters measured 6" by 10".

 

 


This is a 1920 Class 1 Commercial or Truck plate, with the original colors being white on dark blue.   From 1914 through 1919 PA used a system of 1 to 5 stars to designate truck classes, then for 1920 the system was expanded to 7 classes identified by the first digit in the plate serial number.  Plates like the one shown here with both a top and bottom legend were 7 inches high, while the width could vary depending on the number of characters in the serial number.  Click the link to see more variations.  Thanks to Clayton Moore for the photo.

 


Next is this pair of 1923 Commercial or Truck plates, with the colors being yellow on dark blue.  The same weight class numbering system was in use from 1920 through 1923, with classes starting at 1 for the lightest weight trucks and going to 7 for the heaviest.  The plate on the far left is considered the highest number Class 1, with the picture from Worthpoint.  The Class 6 is the first plate in that class that I have seen.  Credit for the plate goes to Clayton Moore, and it will be going to Rob Baran.

 


These rusty pieces of tin may not look like much, but if you are a PA plate collector you might recognize them as 1929 Z-Weight Class Truck plates.  In fact, they may be the only such plates known to exist from that year and class.  A great find!  This pair was picked up at Hershey by Tim Gierschick and will be headed to fellow-collector Rob Baran.

 


I may have said this before, but I know little to nothing about the boating world.  So pardon me if some of what I say sounds dumb.  Some time ago Eric Tanner alerted me to Pennsylvania plates called a Boat Dock Permit. We know that there were Motorboat (MBL & MB) plates and stickers, also Dept. of Forests & Waters watercraft plates, but how do Boat Dock Permits, which were also issued by the Dept. of Forests & Waters, fit in?  Is it a permit to have a boat dock on lakes or bodies of water under the Dept. of Forests & Waters, later by the Dept. of Environmental Resources?  Or was it a permit to dock a boat in such a place?  In any case here are two examples from Ian Emmett.  The far left is possibly a 74 Boat Dock Permit with a 77 sticker, next to that is a 1978 Boat Dock Permit with a 79 sticker.  Ian is working on getting some additional images.

 


10/2/2022 Posting

Through the help of Jordan Irazabal, this website has now been moved to a new web hosting service. 

Hopefully all pages and features are working.

Thank you Jordan.

 


This is the first and only photo of a Citizens Hose Company No. 1.  Record check shows only 4 serial numbered plates issued.  PennDOT lists the organization as Citizens Hose Fire Company — a little confusing.  Thanks to Brayden Harnish for this image.

 


This is a personalized Honoring Our Women Veterans plate thanks to Bruce Bufalini.  While it is not classified as a Veterans' plate, it's actually a Special Fund plate with funds from the sale of this plate benefiting the Veterans Trust Fund.

 


In addition to this U.S. Marine Corps Veteran image from Arthur Levine, see this week's display of personalized and vanity plates.

 

 


Last week I posted this personalized Pennsylvania DUI Association / Team DUI plate on the far left from Arthur Levine.  Then Arthur sent me a higher resolution image that I was able to edit to give it a straight-on look.

 

 


This is the highest Carnegie Mellon University photographed, thanks to Brayden Harnish; however, in February of 2019, Bruce Bufalini spotted C/M00382, but was unable to get a photo.  It should also be noted that in February of 2015, this plate type was discontinued, so there will not be any with the map outline, and plate check shows the highest plate issued to be C/M00396.  Anyone have a higher plate than the one shown here?

 

 


While this Berwyn Fire Company plate, with a sticker well, is not a new high, it does help narrow down the point where the map outline was added.  Previously the map outline was photographed on 00081B/F.  Thanks to Brayden Harnish for this image.

 


Here is a new high Pennsylvania 60 Day Temporary Intransit tag thanks to Jordan Irazabal.

 

 


This 1955 Passenger plate may appear to have a unique serial number, but it's actually part of what I list as Format 9 which ran from 1AA0 to 9ZZ99.  All passenger plates measured 6" x 10¼" regardless of the plate being 4 or 5 characters.  This plate image came from Worthpoint.

 


This is a low-number 1956 Passenger plate.  The first series likely started at 1000 or 1001 and went to 99999.  1956 was the first year where the plate size was standardized at 6 inches by 12 inches.  See additional '56 Passenger plates below.  This image came from Worthpoint.

 


There were several 1956 Passenger serial progressions that switched to the 1957 5-character dies toward the end.  One group, which I call Format 15, ran from D0A00 into the J-series using the standard dies, then switched to the 57 5-character dies (Format 15A) at K6C16 and ran to P9Z99 where that series ended.  The plates shown here are all from that final K- to P-series. These images are from Worthpoint.  Still need a Format 9, '56 Passenger with '57 5-character dies between 1AW0 and 8MW81.

 


Two Dept. of Forests & Waters plates were added from 1948 and 1954.

 


9/25/2022 Posting

Here is another new high Antique Vehicle plate.  Very common, especially at car shows, but less common as the weather grows colder.  This most recent series started at A0AA with the initial A being the last character to advance.  This series was first seen around March of 2020.  Another Antique plate was spotted, H8PA, funny, and actually a higher plate than the one shown above.

 


How about a new Farm Truck high?  Not sure when these plates added the map outline, appears to be somewhere between FM-2587D and FM-4184D.  Can anyone narrow this down?

 


And a new School Bus high thanks to John Fedorchak.  The use of the map outline has been in use since SC-82300 which was about 2 years ago.

 


If you haven't spotted any plates in the new Passenger M-series, here are a few recent photos.  The MBA plate is thanks to Brayden Harnish; MBB is from David Dohan; and MBC is from Richard Than.

 


Person with Disability plates released on the www fade base ran from PD0000A to PD9999Y before switching to the visitPA base at PD0000Z.  The plate shown here is still on the road, and shows a low number in the S-suffix series.  The suffix letter is the last to advance in this series.  Thanks to David Dohan for the photo.

 


Here is a personalized Pennsylvania DUI Association / Team DUI plate from Arthur Levine.  It's a little hard to see but this is also the first of these spotted with the map outline.  These organizational plates came out in 2005 and are pretty rare with only 114 serial numbered plates registered.

 


In addition to this image on the far left from Clayton Moore, and the near left from Ken Samen, see this week's display of personalized and vanity plates.

 

 

 


Here is a pristine, first generation St. Francis College plate photo from John Clark.  The plate appears to be unused.  The St. Francis plate program dates back to 1999.  Up till now, we only had a sample image from this first edition.

 


The beautiful 1954 Tractor plate on the far left, still showing its original gloss, was a flea market find by Clayton Moore, then passed on to Jeff Hinkle.  The other plate is the alpha-numeric series '54 Tractor high, with that photo coming from Worthpoint.  These plates measured 6" x 10¼". 

 


It's always nice to be able to fill a gap in one the historic plate progressions.  And so it is with this 1936 U-Weight Class Truck plate.  1936 used two U-class progressions, U000A and U00A0, with the plate shown here being part of the second group.  This plate measures 6 inches by 12 inches.  The image is thanks to eBay user Tagshack.

 


Like the plate above, this 1956 Truck plate also fills a gap in the U-Weight Class series.  By 1956, four serial progressions were used including U000A, U00A0, U0A00, U00AA with the plate shown here being part of the second group.  This plate measures 6 inches by 12 inches.  The image is thanks to eBay user Tagshack.

 


9/18/2022 Posting

PA License Plate News - On 8/28 we reported that PA will be replacing all Dealer and Miscellaneous Motor Vehicle Business plates.  The new plates will be the standard colors, but with the addition of vehicle silhouettes.  At this point only limited info is available, but generic Dealer series will be split into New Dealer and Pre-Owned Dealer.  The Pre-Owned Dealer series will start at PR00000, it is unknown how the New Dealer plates will be configured.  Repair Towing will be using 10000RT, currently they use RT-12345.  At this point it does not appear that Motorcycle and Moped Dealer types will be effected.  Anyone know more?

 


Legislative News - State Representative Sheryl M. Delozier has introduced legislation that would allow vendor-designed license plates for those who wanted them.  Bill was passed in the House, then referred to the Senate Transportation Committee.  Not surprisingly PennDOT is opposed to such a move.  The purpose of the legislation would be to generate revenue for the Motor Licensing Fund, and to offer something more creative to motorists.  The legislation is House Bill 2632.   Link to WHTM Channel 27 news article.

 


This is a new high Person with Disability plate thanks to Bill Stephens.  This serial format, with the alpha-prefix dates back to February of this year.

 

 


Here is an Amateur Radio plate sporting a nice call sign.  The plate does have the map outline.  The plastic cover takes away from the photo quality.

 

 


This is a personalized Share The Road plate, which is part of the Special Fund series.  This is also the first of this type spotted with the map outline.  It appears that standard issue Share The Road plates still have the sticker well.  Thanks to Matt Ciecka for the photo.

 

 


Here is another Mass Transit high from Brayden Harnish.  Brayden provided M/T50464 a couple weeks ago.  Makes me think they were from the same batch plates issued to the same bus company.

 

 


Check this out — Rob Baran snapped a photo of a utility trailer with a Railroad - Preserve Our Heritage plate.  Legal — yes.  Unusual —  also yes.  It's PA's only remaining full graphic plate.  PA says “Requests for Special Fund registration plates are restricted to passenger cars, motor homes, trailers or trucks with a registered gross weight of not more than 14,000 lbs.” The plate registration number is valid.

 

 

 

 


In addition to this image from Nick Tsilakis, see this week's display of personalized and vanity plates.

 

 

 

 

 


Chris Van Zandt snapped the photo on the far left of a single digit Antique Historic Car plate.  The photo is from a recent car show.  It is my understanding that this plate series dates back to 1956, beginning at plate 1, which is also shown on this website.  In 2005 the series went to the family of plates base, with a new plate legend Antique Vehicle.  Both styles of plates continue to be in use, and are very common at car shows.

 

 

 

 


Here is a new high 1907 Passenger plate.  This white on red porcelain plate measures 6½ inches by 10½ inches; however, 1 and 2 digit plates were 6 inches tall since the PENNA 1907 legend was along side rather than on top.  Click the link to see examples.  The manufacturer was Ing-Rich also known as Ingram Richardson of Beaver Falls, PA.  This photo came from Worthpoint.

 


This 1912 Passenger plate appears to be a new high, unfortunately it no longer has the aluminum keystone emblem with the maker's number.  This white on wood-grain porcelain plate measures 6 inches by 14 inches.  The manufacturer was Brilliant Manufacturing Co., Phila., PA.  This photo came from Worthpoint.

 


I finally decided to bring the section on Dept. of Forests & Waters watercraft plates to life.  For most plate enthusiasts these boat plates don't seem to rise to the same level of collectibility as plates used on highway vehicles.  These were plates issued to watercraft which were used on lakes or bodies of water under the ownership or control of the Department of Forests and Waters.  The plates measured 3½" by 4½", and are believed to be issued as early as 1937 and up to 1970.  Plates were all-numerical with the serial progression going from 1 or 2 digits up to five digits.  Later the Department of Forests and Waters became part of the Department of Environmental Resources. 

Last week I posted the 1945 and '47 images seen to the left from Worthpoint.  These photos of the 1963, '64 and '65 plates are from eBay user Themudlarks. 

Several years ago Jason Michaels maintained an extensive display of such plates on his website.  Sadly Jason passed away in March of 2020, and the website has been taken down.  Previous efforts to contact someone associated with the website have been futile.

 


9/11/2022 Posting

Today marks the 21st anniversary of the September 11 attacks on the United States.  Let us never forget what took place that day, the losses suffered and the sacrifices endured since then.  Nearly 3000 lives were taken that day, among which were 343 firefighters.

 


Here is a personalized Gold Star Family plate from Eric Conner.  Eric captions this photo with "A special and somber vanity on a plate base that many parents don't really want."  Plate check shows that 852 serial numbered plates have been registered to date.  Sad.

 

 


Here is a a new high Silver Star plate thanks to Nick Tsilakis.  These plates have been around since 2012, with only 60 serial numbered plates issued to date.  The Silver Star Medal is the United States Armed Forces' third-highest military decoration for valor in combat. The Silver Star Medal is awarded primarily to members of the United States Armed Forces for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States.

 


Next up is this personalized U.S. Military Airborne Units plate, also thanks to Nick Tsilakis.  These plates have been around since 2013, with some 650 serial numbered plates issued to date in addition of those personalized.

 

 


This is a low number Conserve Wild Resources plate on the small graphic base.  This base dates back to November of 2017, after the full-graphic base was discontinued.  Thanks to Nick Tsilakis for the photo.  The latest reported high on this base is R/C04999.

 

 


This is a new high Delaware Valley Chapter of the BMW Car Club of America, thanks to Richard Than.  These plates date back to 2011, with the map outline first seen at 00174B/W.  The name of this organization, with its 54 letters and spaces, appears to be the longest of any PA plate.

 


Another new high from Dickinson College, and another thank you to Richard Than.  The Dickinson plate program dates back to 1998 on the yellow on blue base.

 

 

 


Here is a new, slightly higher, Bus plate from Mike Alfonse.  This was in use on a limo-type vehicle, not an unusual combo here in PA.  Here is a link to a Fact Sheet that describes all of the many types of Bus, Limo, Taxi, etc. plates offered in PA.

 

 


This is a new high Apportioned Truck plate.  The AH-series was first spotted in December of 2020 and advances almost 30-thousand plates since then.  Thanks to Richard Than for the photo.

 

 


Here is a new high Truck plate thanks to Richard Than.  This current series with the map outline started at ZKJ-0000 and was announced by PennDOT on 12/18/2016, but not spotted until April of 2017.

 

 


Two weeks in a row we have a new Permanent Trailer plate high thanks to Bill Young.  Last week it was PT-502P2.

 

 

 


Here are a couple of Person with Disability vanity plates.  The WZ plate photo came from me, while the XION photo was from Mike Alfonse.  Not sure what the colorful design is on the XION plate.

 

 


This is the first personalized Mario Lemieux Foundation plate spotted with the new logo.  Brendan Sherry spotted the plate and interprets it to mean 66, 68, 87 and 71 in five characters, the numbers of four Pittsburgh Penguins legends.

 

 

► In addition to these, see this week's display of personalized and vanity plates.

 


Here is a very unusual 1953 YZ-Weight Class Truck plate.  The double prefix letters indicates that this is a 3-axle truck plate.  For various reasons very few double letter prefix truck plates have survived.  Probably one reason is the small number issued.  Anyway, thank you to Rick Kretschmer and his website, Ricksplates.com for the use of this photo.

 


Here is another unusual plate, this one being a 1956 Y-Weight Class Truck.  Two things make this plate unique, first it represents a new Y-series high (with the previous high being Y09N4), secondly, with this plate nearing the end of production, it uses the thinner '57 5-character dies.  Another thank you to Rick Kretschmer for the plate photo.

 


9/4/2022 Posting

For a while plate watchers have been pondering the debut of Passenger plates in the M-series.  The expected sequence would start at MBA-0000, etc. since vowels are no longer used in the second position, so no MAA- plates.  Record check as of 9/3 indicates that so far MBA-0000 has not been registered; however, plates from MBA-0820 to MBA-0827 are registered.  Dealers and tag services receive plates in groups, so it's understandable that plates would be registered out of sequence.  Thanks to John Silbert for this image.

 


Here is a new high Severely Disabled Veteran plate photo thanks to Matt Ciecka.  This new format was first spotted in October of 2021, with the starting point being 80000DV.

 

 


Here is a new Mass Transit high thanks to Brayden Harnish.  The use of the map outline likely began at M/T47700.  Mass Transit plates date back to the 1977 base, and were originally blue on yellow.

 

 


Here is another new Motorcycle high.  Last week we had 5YD02.  So the sequence is quickly moving toward the end point of 9ZZ99.  Where will it go next — 00AA0?  The current series, 0AA00 dates back to mid-2015.  Thanks to Preston Turner for the photo.

 

 

 

 


Here is a new high Municipal Government plate on a police SUV.  The plate was spotted by Bill Young.  This "family of plates" base was first spotted in February of 2017, and took the place of the white on blue, all embossed Municipal plate.  Many of those older plates continue to be in use, including some of the previous blue on white issue.

 

 

 

 


It may not be a perfect shot, but it is a new PennDOT Official Use Commercial Vehicle high.  The final character on the plate would be a T.  Thanks to Bill Young for the photo.

 

 

 


Here is a new high Permanent Trailer plate thanks to Bill Young.

 

 

 


Last week we had a new high pair of Pennsylvania State University official plates.  This week we have another new high thanks to Brayden Harnish.

 

 


Here's another Penn State University plate, also from Brayden Harnish.  This plate type is available to any Penn State fan, there is no need to be an alumni.  There is also a Penn State Alumni Association plate which does require alumni association membership.  Click this link to see more about Penn State plates.

 


Speaking of organizational plates, there are several organizations with full-size plates where a motorcycle version is also available.  These include International Association of Fire Fighters (no plates photographed),  Blue Knights Int'l Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club (1 vanity photographed), Fraternal Order of Police (no plates photographed).  The IAFF prototype shown here was provided by PennDOT; however, none of these motorcycle prototypes are shown on PennDOT's webpage showing the artwork for such plates.  The downside of these motorcycle plates is that the organizational logo has been reduced to the size of a postage stamp.

 


► See this week's display of personalized and vanity plates.

 


This is an unused NASCAR 19 Jeremy Mayfield plate.  Thanks to Tom Firth for the photo.  These NASCAR 19 plates were issued for the 2004, 2005 and 2006 racing seasons, with a total of only about 21 plates being issued.  The NASCAR program had its start in late 2004, and as of 5/1/2010 PA NASCAR plates were no longer issued but still renewable.  There are still about 15 NASCAR plate types for which plates were issued but no photos are known.  A number of types had no issued plates.

 


Last, but certainly not least, is this 1925 Format 1 Dealer plate thanks to Bill Koneski.  For many years plate size depended on the number of characters in the serial number.  For 1925 Dealer plates could be a 6" by 10" shorty as shown here, also 6" by 12" and 6" by 15".  The shorty plates would have been configured as X-1 to X-99, then X100 to X999.

 


8/28/2022 Posting

With so many friends, plate spotters and facebook posts, it's a real challenge some weeks to keep up with the ever-changing list of plate highs, new types, and occasional plates of historical significance.


PA License Plate News - Your license plate frame is enough to get you cited according to the PA Superior Court.  Both articles linked below say essentially the same thing, that no portion of the plate may be obstructed.  Ironically 3 of the 5 Superior Court plate photos on this website have frames.

► See article from Bruce Bufalini.

► See article from Rob Baran.


In other Plate News - PennDOT to replace all Dealer and Miscellaneous Motor Vehicle Business plates.  The Miscellaneous group includes Repair Towing (RT), Salvage Yard (WL), Transporter (DT), Repossessor (RE) and Watercraft Trailer Dealers (WD). The new plates will be the standard colors, but with the addition of vehicle silhouettes.  Don't know if this change includes Dealer-Multi Purpose, Dealer-Farm Equipment and Trailer Dealer.

 


Here's a #1 and the first Upper Gwynedd Township Fire Department plate spotted.  Nice find Jaska Börner.  This plate type was added earlier this year, but with only a prototype image.  Plate check suggests there are currently six serial numbered plates issued.

 

 


Here's another first.  This is the only PA National Guard plate photographed so far, and is thanks to Nathan Krawzyk.  It is also a personalized plate reflecting the zip code of the owner.  Standard issue PA National Guard plates would be in the 90000A/D series with some 68 of them registered.  It should be noted that these plates are not the same as the National Guard plates with the N/G prefix that are considered organizational plates.

 


This is a new high U.S. Army Veteran plate spotted by Jaska Börner.

 

 

 


If this personalized Associated Alumni of the Central High School plate looks familiar, it was previously posted in 2019; however, this is a nicer image.  Thank you to Jaska Börner for both images.

 

 

Also see this week's display of personalized and vanity plates.

 


Here is a pair of new high Pennsylvania State University official plates.  The far left was recently spotted by Brayden Harnish, the other is from Jaska Börner.  Then Brayden spotted A4904P but was not able to get a photo.  These plates are used on vehicles owned by Penn State.  The current 'family of plates' format came into use in 2019 at A4700P.

 


Two weeks in a row we have another Classic Vehicle high.  This photo is thanks to Jaska Börner.

 

 

 


Here is a new high Motorcycle plate thanks to Jaska Börner.  As you can see the current series is not all that far from the end at 9ZZ99.  Where will it go next — 00AA0?  It may be a while, the current series, 0AA00 dates back to mid-2015.

 

 


This Person with Disability plate from the A-series also represents a new high.  This photo is thanks to Jaska Börner.

 

 

 


Here's a new Trailer high from Brayden Harnish.  A little recent history on Trailer plates.  In 2000 when plates were replaced, the series started at XK-00000 on the www / fade band base.  Then in 2004 that series was exhausted and a new 3-letter prefix started at XBA-0000.  In 2005 the base was changed to the solid band / family of plates base at XCA-0000.  2018 saw the disappearance of the sticker well and the addition of the map outline at XKY-0000.  And on it goes.

 

 


This PA Passenger plate was snapped by Tom Castelli with the caption "Why do people do this?"  Unfortunately not everyone in PA has the fondness for the "Family of Plates" look that PennDOT has.  And unfortunately there is only one full graphic plate that is not part of the "Family of Plates", that being the Preserve Our Heritage - Railroad plate.

 

 


This is the latest Motorboat Registration sticker.  There is also a UNPOWERED version.  It is my understanding that these represent a 2-year registration period, with the large number, 24, indicating the year of expiration.

 

 


Here is a very nice 1954 Y-Weight Class Truck plate from the Y00A0 serial progression which is the second of two.  I previously posted another of the same progression but this one is much nicer.  Still need one from the Y000A progression, as well as several other classes.  1954 plates measured 6" by 10¼".  Plates were issued as singles.  Photo is from Worthpoint.

 


Finally found a 1957 W-Weight Class Truck plate.  This plate was on Worthpoint with two photos, neither of which showed the entire plate, so with a little editing, it now does.  By 1957 all plates measured 6" by 12", and all Truck plates contained 6 characters.

 

 


The original photos posted for the 1964-67 W- & Y-Class Truck plates were of insufficient size, so these were added.  These photos are from Worthpoint.

 

 


Here is a Council plate provided by Sarge from Klassy Karz.  I believe these plates could have been used as front plates on vehicles used by members of a city or borough council.  Not sure of the plate's vintage, although this is the third variation on this website.  Click link to view others.

 


8/21/2022 Posting

Here's the first image of a Legion of Merit plate.  These plates were first available in February of 2019.  A record check indicates that there are currently 54 serial-numbered plates in use.  The Legion of Merit is awarded to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States or a friendly foreign nation who has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements.  Thanks to Nick Tsilakis for photographing and sharing this plate.  Crossed this one off the Needed List.

 


Here is a new high Antique Vehicle plate.  The current serial formatting started at A0AA, with the letter in the first position being the last to advance — so yes, it can be confusing.  Thanks to Bruce Bufalini for the photo.

 

 


The Antique Motorcycle plate is one of the nine antique, classic and collectible vehicle plates offered to PA vehicle owners.  The plate shown here is also a new high.  The letter 'A' in the 4th position is the last character to advance as the serial number progresses.  Thanks to Bruce Bufalini for the photo.

 


This Classic Vehicle plate is also a new high.  The addition of the 'C' prefix was first seen in July of 2004.  The map outline was first seen in July of 2017.  Thanks to Bruce Bufalini for the photo.

 

 


Here is a new Street Rod high, also thanks to Bruce Bufalini.  This series switched to this redundant base near the end of 2016, yet still has the sticker well.  A later batch of plates starting at 7600S/R will likely have the map outline, which could be a while yet.

 

 


Here is a new Vertical Motorcycle high, also thanks to Bruce Bufalini.  This plate is part of the second serial progression with the first being M0A0C and the second and current progression being MA0AC.  The first and last characters, M and C, are part of the serial number, but they do not advance.  Therefore, the C9R is the portion of the plate that changes.  Within that group, the number (9) advances first, then the third character (R), and finally the first character (C).  Confused yet?

 

 


John Clark brings us this new high Commonwealth Constables Association plate.  This is certainly one you seldom, if ever see.  Record check shows only 40 serial-numbered plates issued.  These plates date back to 2015.

 

 


This is a personalized Bronze Star for Valor plate and is the first one spotted with the map outline.  Thanks to Brayden Harnish for the image.

 

 

 


There's always room for a #1 plate, and so we have this Michigan State Alumni plate photo from Brayden Harnish.  The Michigan State plate program dates back to 2012.  There are well under 100 of these plates on the road.

 

 


It may not be much to look at, but it is a new Ohio State Alumni photo-high on the www base that was issued to replace the original yellow on blue base on a number for number basis back in 2001.  Thanks to Brayden Harnish for the image.

 

 


Yes, this is a personalized plate and it is part of this week's display of a group of such plates, but it is also a rare vanity on a trailer.  PennDOT uses the Passenger base for these, rather than the Trailer base.  It's a little hard to read but the plate appears to have a #-20 sticker.  This would indicate that the owner had chosen a 5-year registration option.  Thanks to Bill Ceravola for this photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This 1956 Used Car Dealer plate was spotted by Bruce Bufalini in use as a YOM (Year of Manufacture) plate at a car show.  I don't really track highs on these but the registration number provides a new high for the Archives and Eric Tanner's site.

 

 


8/14/2022 Posting

Here is a new high, agency-specific, Official Use PennDOT plate.  This plate is used on a non-commercial vehicle, or passenger vehicle, as commercial vehicles or trucks use a different serial format, i.e. P/A0000T.  The other agencies having their own plates include the PA State Police and the PA Turnpike.  There are also non-agency specific Official Use plates as well.  Thanks to Brayden Harnish for the image.

 


Here's another new plate high.  This PA Breast Cancer Coalition photo is also thanks to Brayden Harnish.  These plates date back to 2005.

 

 

 


And another high from Brayden Harnish.  This plate is a new issue in spite of its appearance, York College remains with their all-embossed original design including the sticker well.  It may be worth mentioning that as of 10-22-2021 plates up to 01199Y/C were in the warehouse inventory.  After reaching that number, it will be interesting to see what York College does.

 


How about a new Transporter high, also thanks to Brayden Harnish.  This plate still appears to have a validation sticker, so while this is the highest observed plate, a record check shows that DT-16145 is the registered high.  That plate likely has the map outline.

 

 


► Click this Vanity Page link to see additional personalized plates of the week including this "You've Got a Friend" era plate still in use from Bill Young.

 

 

 


Here is a low number 1914 Dealer plate.  This white on black porcelain tag measures 6 inches by 10 inches and is the second of four sizes used that year depending on the number of characters in the serial number.  I took this photo at an ALPCA plate meet in Bethlehem on June 11, but missed identifying the owner.  I'd like to credit the owner if possible.

 


This, as the plate says, is the #1 1932 Legislative plate.  Plate size is 6 inches by 12 inches.  Such plates extended at least as high as 260 and were likely used by both the House and Senate.  Credit for this unique plate would go to John Willard and John Anshant.

 

 


Aside from the colors being reversed, the 1933 Legislative plate is much like the 1932 above.  The number series is known to go from 1 to 334.  This image is from Worthpoint.

 

 


This low number 1933 National Guard plate is similar in design to the '33 Legislative plate above.  It was my understanding that with each succeeding year of membership, the plate number would likely be lower as more senior members would retire.

 

 


It's definitely not much to look at, but it fills a gap in the 1945 Format 4 Passenger series which ran from 10A0 to 99Z99.  This is the first 4-character plate from that series seen.  The photo is from Worthpoint.

Still in need of a Format 8, 4-character in the AA10 to ZZ99 series.  Was this series ever issued?

 


No matter how you look at it Bob Connison has a nice run of low number Passenger plates starting with a pair of 1950s, and a pair of 1951s.  After '51 the state went to singles.  All '50 and '51 plates measured 6 inches by 11 inches.

Also see Group Display Page for other similar exhibits.

 

Plates beginning in 1952 were issues as singles.  Most '52 plates, including the one shown here, measured 6 inches by 11 inches; however some later plates were scaled back to 6 inches by 10¼ inches.  Plates from 1953, 1954 and 1955 were all 6 inches by 10¼ inches.  Then, as you may recall, that beginning in 1956 all full-size plates were standardized to 6 inches by 12 inches.  Note the difference in the map outline between the 1955, 1956, 1957 and 1958.  Note the difference in serial dies between the '56, '57 and '58.  The '58 also has multi-year validation thru 1964.

 

 

 


8/7/2022 Posting

A new feature has been added called Needed Images to help identify the growing number of plate types without photos.  This website is dedicated to photo-documenting as many plate types and variations as possible.  Any help with pictures of any of the listed plate types, would be much appreciated.  Many are new issues or logo updates.  Also included are a number of low-issue NASCAR plates, and several extinct or nearly extinct types from the 1980s and 90s.

 


Here is the #1 82nd Airborne Division Association plate.  The photo was snapped by Ben Vaughn in Pittsburgh.  This plate type has been on the street since 2007.  The most recent observed high was 00290A/B, which was in June of 2019.

 

 


Zach Taylor posted this Conserve Wild Resources - Otter plate photo at the end of May, which I missed.  When these plates switched to the small graphic, the series started at R/C00001 which was back in November of 2017.  At present the registered high is around R/C05562.

 

 


While this AH-series Apportioned Truck is not a new high, it is a picture perfect image of an unspoiled plate.  Thanks to Jim Moini for the photograph.  Jim maintains an excellent website featuring New Jersey, Apportioned, Mexican and Corporate Fleet Plates.  https://moini.net/  Check it out.

 


These Person with Disability Motorcycle plates were posted by Clayton Moore.  They are actually standard Motorcycle plates with a sticker.  It is unknown when the Person with Disability stickers were first issued, but likely in the late 1990s.  Anyone know for sure? 

The use of a standard Motorcycle plate + a sticker was replaced in 2007 with Person with Disability Motorcycle plate as shown below.  See Person with Disability, Motorcycle History page for more images.  It may be worth mentioning that a Veteran Motorcycle plate with a Person with Disability sticker, shown below, makes it a Severely Disabled Veteran Motorcycle plate.

 

 

 

 


► Click this Vanity Page link to see additional personalized plates of the week.

 

 

 

 

 


Here is a group of 1967 New Car Dealer plates.  What I recall about such plates is that the plates were actually surplus 1966 plates that were never issued, and rather than discard them, they received '67 stickers.  Dealer plates at the time were issued annually and were not revalidated with stickers.  This practice of re-dating plates also took place with some 1968 and 1969 plates.  The group photo is also posted under Group Displays.  Thanks to Clayton Moore for sharing the display.

 

 

 

 


Ben Vaughn shares an interesting newspaper article sighting vehicle registration records for 1914.  The article indicates that there were 1,167 Tractors registered that year and 116 Trailers.  Click the article to enlarge.  Ben also provided a photo of a 1914 Tractor plate.  This white on black porcelain plate measures 6 inches by 12 inches and would have been issued as part of a pair.

 

 

 

 

 


7/31/2022 Posting

Here is a recent photo of a Linglestown Fire Co. #1 plate from Zachary Bent.  Note that this plate has the map outline, the previous high, 30056L/F, did not.  This plate program dates back to 2008.

 

 


We don't have a photo yet, but Bruce Bufalini recently spotted Legion of Merit plate number 10052L/M but was not able to get a photo.  Record check suggests that plates from 10001 to 10054 are in use.  The medal is awarded for: Exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements.

 


It's worth mentioning that Nick Tsilakis spotted a motorcycle version of the International Association of Firefighters but could not get a photo.  The plate he saw was P/F0010.  Record check shows that 41 plates are in use.  I don't even have a prototype plate image, so I did a R2K request to PennDOT on Tuesday and received nothing than an acknowledgement so far.

 


This is part of what I have categorized as a Format 6 Antique Motorcycle Plate.  That group ran from 0A to 99Z.  The wide bolt hole spacing indicates that this is not one of the earliest groups of Antique Motorcycle plates.  This plate is still valid.  Possibly someone can narrow down the time period.  The plate was photographed by John Fedorchak, but had been previously spotted by Preston Turner who was unable to get a picture.

 

 

 

 


Didn't get any vanities posted last week, so here are a few.  The far left is an eye-catching U.S. Marine Corps Veteran vanity.  Next is a personalized Antique Vehicle plate showing the letter "I" and numeral 1 next to each other.  This photo is thanks to Bill Stephens.  Unlike most PA plates, the letter "I" has been used as part of the serial progression on Antique Vehicle Format 11 plates and Motorcycle plates.

  ► Click this Vanity Page link to see additional personalized plates of the week.

 


Added this low number International Association of Firefighters to the Organizational Plate History page.  Also added this high number plate which is a new high for the Archives.  This plate program dates back to 1993.  Both images are from Worthpoint.

 


Finally succeeded in finding a West Point Alumni Sample plate.  For whatever reason these seem to be very scarce.  The West Point plate program dates back to 1987.  This nice image came from Worthpoint.

 

 


They didn't get much lower than this — considering the fact that the 1949 Passenger plate series started at 1001.  This initial series eventually went to 99999 before extending into numerous alpha-numeric formats.  These plates measured 6 inches by 11 inches and were issued in pairs.  Thanks to Tim Gierschick for the photo.

 


Much like the plate above, this 1950 Passenger plate was part of the initial all-numeric series running from 1001 to 99999.  These plates measured 6 inches by 11 inches and were still issued in pairs.  Thanks to Tim Gierschick for the photo.

 

 


7/24/2022 Posting

Sorry, this update didn't get posted until 7/25.

Here is a new Passenger high recently spotted by John Fedorchak.

 

 

 

 


The Hearing Impaired is one of PA's rarest plates.  Do not let the 3281 serial number suggest that over 3000 plates have been issued.  The series actually started at HE-03000 on the www base.  They originally dated back to 1987 on the yellow on blue base.  Thanks to Richard Than for this photo.

 


It's been 12+ years since PA issued NASCAR plates, yet they are still renewable, and there are still several plate types that have never been photographed.  The 2005 racing season NASCAR 99 plates of Carl Edwards is one such plate.  There were logo color differences for 2005, 2006 and 2009, yet so far no plates have been photographed with the green 2005 logo, except samples.  The plate shown here with the 2006 colors helps establish that the group ran from N/9/90109, or lower, to N/9/90113.  Many thanks to Richard Than for this photo.  Does anyone in the hobby collect these?

 


Here is a new high Official Use Truck plate and was provided by Richard Than.  This plate would have been used on a state-owned vehicle, but not one used by PennDOT, State Police or Turnpike, as those agencies have plates with their own logos.

 

 


What do we have here?  Yes, it's a Person with Disability plate, and was provided by Richard Than.  My first thought is that  it was part of the double plate series starting at 98000PD, but plate check shows that plates only up to 98161PD have been issued so far.  It also appears that no plates in the 99000PD series have been issued, except for the one shown here.  Therefore, I am of the opinion that this is a vanity plate.

 


It ain't pretty, but it's a needed piece to complete photo displays of the 1945 U-Weight Class truck series.  The U-series consisted of U000A, U00A0, U0A00 and U00AA.  Plate measures 6" by 11".  This image is from Worthpoint, a service to which I have a subscription.

 

 


And they're not getting any nicer, but again it's a needed piece to complete photo displays of the 1947 Y-Weight Class truck series.  There was only a single Y-series, Y000A.  Plate measures 6" by 11".  Again this image is from Worthpoint.

 

 


For 1951 R-Weight Class trucks there were 6 serial progressions, including R000A, R00A0, R0A00, R00AA, R0AA0 and R0A0A.  This plate fills the remaining photo gap.  Plate measures 6" by 11".  Again, this image is from Worthpoint.  '51 was the last year for plates to be issued in pairs.  This image is from Worthpoint.

 


This 1954 S-Weight Class truck fills the remaining photo gap.  S-class plates consisted of S000A, S00A0, S0A00, S00AA, S0AA0, with all plates measuring 6" x 10¼".  These plates were issued as singles.    This image is from Worthpoint.

 


7/17/2022 Posting

My apologies, Bill Stephens spotted this new Passenger high back on July 8, so I'm a little behind.  It has, however, been posted to the High Page, thanks to Jordan.

 

 


Here is a new high Permanent Trailer I spotted in my travels.  It was a windshield shot with the truck moving.

 

 

 


Here is a new high Temporary Intransit cardboard plate.  The photo was snapped by Jordan.

 

 

 


This is a new high Truck plate recently spotted on the fly by Nick Tsilakis.  After exhausting this series at ZVZ-9999, the next series will be ZWA-0000.

 

 


Here is one from Bill Ceravola added to this week's Vanity Page.

 

 

 

 

 

 


It appears that from the earliest state issued plates there was always those who sought low number plates, especially those with political connections.  Just look at the 1912 registration records for the first 100+ plates; it kind of reads like a who's who in PA at the time.  Eventually the demand for such plates went beyond the political arena and was made available to the average driver.  An application form was developed for 1965 Special Registration Plates spelling out the process.  Thank you to John Willard for a copy of the form.

 


Click the photo to the left to enlarge this pair of low number 1914 and 1915 Passenger plates, or click on the photos below to see them individually.  The photo of these 100+ year old plates is thanks to John Willard.  The 1914 is white on black, while the '15 is white on sky blue.  Both are 6" by 10" and were manufactured by Brilliant Manufacturing Co.   

of Philadelphia.  

 

 

 


These are 1929 W-Weight Class Truck plates that were recently spotted by Tim Gierschick at Renningers.  These W-Class plates measure 6" by 15", with a documented high of W8-646.  Anyone have a Y, X or ZZ-Class?

 

 


If you didn't immediately recognize this tag as a Truck plate, you are probably not alone.  For 1930 Truck plates adopted a new, and somewhat cryptic 2-letter suffix method of displaying the weight class of the vehicle, abandoning the R through Z prefix classes.  This plate, for example, is a Class V with the serial formatting from 00PA to 999PZ.  Thanks to Clayton Moore for sharing the image, I also understand the plate's new home will be with Rob B.

 


But wait, there's more!  This 1931 Truck plate came off the same truck!  And again thanks to Clayton Moore for the photo.  It should be noted that in 1931 Truck plates went back to using the R through Z prefix to indicate the weight class.  This was after 1930 plates used a 2-letter suffix to identify truck weight classes as seen above.  This class would have started at V0A00.  This is believed to be the first plate of this class to be documented.

 


7/10/2022 Posting

Here's a street shot of a new high Arcadia University plate thanks to John Clark.  This plate type dates back to 2004.  It appears likely that AU plates will remain on the www base since plates in inventory go up to A/U00999.  Arcadia is located in Glenside, PA, and was formerly called Beaver College.

 


This low number St. Vincent Alumni plate was spotted by Bruce Bufalini.  This plate would have been part of a number-for-number replacement of the first generation yellow on blue plates.  It would have been issued on or around 7/25/2001 according to a record from the period, making it about 21 years on the road.  This plate program dates back to 1992.

 


This Organ Donors Save Lives plate is not a new high.  It is, however, a new high with a sticker well, at least on this website.  I should note that the PA Archives lists D/N01822, as the high with the sticker well, but no photo.  Thanks to John Clark for this photo.

 


This Pennsylvania Equine Council plate represents a new high.  These plates date back to 2012.  Thanks to John Clark for this photo.

 

 


Here's another new high North Penn Vol. Fire Co. plate.  The North Penn plate program dates back to 2010.  While this plate still has a sticker, a record check indicates that no higher serial numbered plates have been issued.  The photo was taken by Richard Than.

 

 

 

 


And one more high thanks to John Clark.  John is keeping us well supplied with highs including this Distracted Driving Awareness plate, which is part of the Special Fund series.  These plates only date back to 2019, and therefore, have always had the map outline.  There is also a Distracted Driving Awareness motorcycle plate available.

 


This WHYY plate is also a new high, again thanks to John Clark.  WHYY is a PBS / NPR TV and FM radio station operating in Philadelphia, PA and Wilmington, DE.  Their plate program dates back to 2009.

 

 


Here is a street shot of a Vietnam War Veteran plate from John Clark.  It's the highest I have, but Jordan lists V/W11416, dated 2/24/2022 from an unknown source.  In any case, that's well over 11,000 plates issued since 1999.

 

 


Here is one final high for the week, this being a Mass Transit plate from Bill Young.

 

 

 


Some unusual plates on the Vanity Page this week, including #1 PA Choose Life, MUSIC Let Freedom Ring, and CWO Expeditionary Forces Veteran, among others.

 


Bill Koneski posted this 1977 keystone base which would have been issued at the end of the run, and about the time the yellow on blue 1984 friend base hit the street.  These plates were eligible to be revalidated up to 2000, thus the '88 & '89 stickers.  This plate has a serial number above the previous high number of GKY-744.  Could the final issued plate be higher still, maybe GKY-999 or GKZ-999? 

 


Could anyone guess that the photo of these two sequential 1940 Tractor plates came from Tim Gierschick?  In Tim's own words, "It took awhile, but I was finally able to bring these two sequential Pa. tractors (farm tractor) together.  I have had the 2576 for awhile."  These plates measure 6 inches by 12 inches and were issued as singles.  The series ran from 0001 to 8437 or above.

 

 

 


This is a 1944 Tractor plate, it's also a new high eclipsing the old high of 3952.  With 9503 being so close to the end of the 4-digit run, it wonders me, as a PA Dutchmen might say, if the series ever extended into the A000 series.  This 6-inch by 12-inch plate was a recent acquisition of Tim Gierschick's.

 


Next up is this low-number 1945 Tractor plate, also thanks to Tim.  The Tractor plate number series from 1937 through 1956 started at 0001 and went to 9999 if needed, then A000 etc., also if needed.  1945 plates measured 6 inches by 11 inches.

 

 


Here is another low-number plate, this being a 1949 Tractor.  Another thank you to Tim Gierschick.  Like the '45 plate above, this tag also measures 6 inches by 11 inches.

 

 


This is a 1918 1 Star Truck plate belonging to Donald Harman.  The single star represents the lightest of five truck weight classes.  All truck plates that year and the following year used a 'C' prefix.  The number C488, also represents the lowest documented plate, although it is believed that the series began at C1, etc.  Plate sizes varied by the number of characters in the serial number with this plate measuring 6" by 13½".

 


7/3/2022 Posting

Image result for July 4th Clipart 

Happy Independence Day


Not often do we see a high and a low together.  This #1 AMVETS plate was recently spotted by Zachary Bent, while the A/V00200 plate is the current high, but is not a new photo.  It was taken a while back by Brandon Sowers but was not posted here at the time.

 


John Clark is keeping us well-supplied with plate photos, and so it is with this new high U.S. Army Veteran tag.  This military veteran plate series dates back to 2009, with the Army Vet starting at 10001A/R.

 

 


This is one of the newer Severely Disabled Veteran plates.  Being personalized, it also conveys a little more about his or her service.  These plates, now on the visitPA base, were first seen in October of 2021 with the DV & wheelchair symbol moved to the suffix position.  Thanks to John Clark for the photo.

 


This is a personalized Honoring Our Veterans plate that was spotted by John Clark.  These plates are part of the Special Fund Series.  These have been on the street since 2012, and are also available in a Motorcycle edition.

 

 


This is the first personalized PA Society of Physician Assistants plates spotted.  It's also the first with the map outline, although it's not uncommon for the map to show up on personalized plates before serial numbered plates.  These plates date back to 2011.  The plate photo is thanks to John Clark.

 


Making a statement.  This is a personalized In God We Trust plate.  This plate type became available in 2014, and is listed by the state as an optional plate type.  Other optional plates include Teen Driver and Let Freedom Ring.  Thanks to Bill Young for the photo.

 With so many personalized plates on the home page this week, the Vanity Page is a little limited.

 


As referenced above, here's a Let Freedom Ring plate.  This one being a new high.  These plates have been available since late 2020, with the new high only being 195, which doesn't say much for plate sales.  The plate photo is thanks to John Clark.

 


Here is a new high PA State Society Daughters of the American Revolution plate thanks to John Clark.  This is the first of such plates to be spotted with the map outline.  These plates date back to 2009.

 

 


This is the first photo of a personalized Cedar Crest College plate.  It's also the first of this type with the map outline; however, as mentioned above, it's not uncommon for the map to show up on personalized plates before serial numbered plates.  Cedar Crest plates date back to 2009; however, the spotted high is only 10027C/C.  Thanks to John Clark for the photo.

 


Check this very nice 1938 Tractor plate.  This beauty was recently acquired by Tim Gierschick.  1938 was the first year to use the map outline on most plate types including Tractor, although it was used a year earlier on Passenger plates. 

Check back next week for some additional Tractor plates.

 


Tim Gierschick, managed to add these three low-numbered Tractor plates to his collection.  Note the 46s are sequential.  Both the 1946 Tractor and the '47 Tractor series ran from 0001 to 9999, then switched to an alpha-numeric format.  These all measured 6 inches by 11 inches with the expiration date in the top border.

 


6/26/2022 Posting

Like last week, more to post, just running short on time.  Check back next week.

Here is the latest high Steel Worker plate thanks to John Clark.  Despite its appearance, this is not classified as an organization plate, but rather a special class of plate resulting from legislation.  This plate still has the sticker well; however, a new batch of plates is due at S/W05600.  According to the application form, MV-910, Steelworker registration plates may only be issued to a person currently or formerly employed in the manufacturer of steel or a surviving member of the steelworker’s family.  Really?

 


This Trout Unlimited plate is another new high from John Clark.  This plate type, which dates back to 2002, continues to remain on the www base, with 1,000+ plates remaining in the warehouse.

 

 


Here's another new high, this Support Your Zoo plate photo was posted by Tiger Joe Sallmen.  These plates still feature the sticker well.  You may recall that these plates took the place of the much more popular Save Wild Animals tags that were issued from 1996 to April of 2013.

 


The far left images represent the first look at a Philadelphia Centurions Motorcycle Club plate on the street.  The photo is thanks to Richard Than.  These plates have been on the street since late 2018, but so far only 5 serial numbered plates have been issued.  This organization is a police motorcycle club, so the plate is listed on the Fire, EMS and Police page.

 

 

 


An 8-character vanity plate?  Matt Ceieck spotted this plate.  A further check by Matt revealed that the plate was originally WRAPM-CH, where the dash (-) or hyphen was made into the letter E.  8 character vanities are not permitted in PA, although some states allow them.  That is not to say that a few such plates haven't slipped thru the system.  In the Lehigh Valley there was a HUMPBACK plate on the www base for a while after 2000, then likely recalled.  There was another 8 character plate reading MCERLANE on the 87 keystone state base with a 91 sticker thanks to Ned Flynn.

 

 


Here is a pair for the single-letter enthusiasts, and the under-100 crowd.  The L photo is thanks to Eric Conner and the 74 plate photo is thanks to John Clark. 

Check out this week's Vanity Page for additional images.

 

 

 


This is a Special Event plate from the 2022 U.S. Senior Open Golf TournamentThese plate are state-issued cardboard tags used on Lexus corporate sponsor courtesy vehicles.  The event is being held at the Saucon Valley Country Club, Bethlehem, PA, June 11 - 28, 2022.  What's not visible at the top of the plate due to the frame are PA TEMPORARY PLATE, and along the bottom Expires 6 - 29 - 2022.

 


Here is a very nicely preserved PA Antique Historic Car plate thanks to Devan Ciemiewicz.  Consensus seems to suggest somewhere around 1960 for a date of issue.  The initial series of these plates ran from 1 to 9999, then went alpha-numeric.  These plates are still legal and are a common sight at car shows.

 


Bruce Bufalini reports seeing Antique Historic Car plate 99ZV which would be a new high on the older white on purple base.  He was not able to safely take a photo.

 


This beautiful 1910 Passenger plate photo combo was posted by Jordan Irazabal.  He was going through some old photos from the 2011 Hagley Car Show, located at the Hagley Mansion, the first du Pont property in the USA.  The Hagley Museum and Library is located in Wilmington, DE.

 

 

 


This gem of a 1939 Passenger plate belongs to Tim Gierschick, who jogs our memory a little reminding us that from 1937 up thru the 1942-43 issue that the Passenger plate series started at 10000 and extending to 99999, making this a low number plate.

 

 


Jason Cook stumbled on this plate photo in C.H. Wendels’ book: ‘Unusual Vintage Tractors’.  It looks like a 1918 Tractor plate E2978. The far left photo shows a Hollis Tractor Company, out of Pittsburgh, PA.  The photos are ‘newspaper’ dot quality.  Click the image to the far left, or go to the Older Plates in Use page where the image can be further enlarged.

 

 


Here's another great 1931 Tractor plate.  No surprises, it's thanks to Tim Gierschick!  These plates were yellow on dark blue as shown here, with all such plates measuring 6 inches by 15 inches.  Serial numbers are known as high as TE3-066.

 


6/19/2022 Posting

Happy Father's Day

(Sorry, couldn't get more plates posted.  Check back next week.  The healthcare industry is claiming my time.)


Here is a new high Passenger plate, recently spotted by Bruce Bufalini.

Keep up to date with all the latest highs with the Highs page, or go to link in left column.

 


This is not a new International Association of Fire Fighters high, but the highest number spotted before the sticker well was eliminated.  The lowest without the sticker well is P/F6525.  Thanks to Jordan Irazabal's watchful eye for the photo.

Still looking for a Motorcycle edition of this plate.  They're out there.

 


 

This is an uncommon plate type, with the plate frame helping to conceal its identity.  Bruce Bufalini spotted this personalized St. Charles Borromeo Seminary plate.  This is the first plate spotted without the sticker box.  The facility is located in Wynnewood, PA.  According to plate check, there are only 13 serial numbered plates registered.

 


Check out this week's Vanity Page for more images.

 


This is a new Mass Transit high spotted by Bill Young.  This series has been using the map outline since back in the mid-48000 series.

Click this Mass Transit History link to see 1st and 2nd generation plates.

 

 

 


This is a 1965 Press Photographer base with a 66 sticker.  Note the presence of the keystone separator, not a usual part of a PP plate.  It was photographed by Jordan Irazabal at a 2021 Tim Gierschick gathering.  If the actual plate owner comes forward, I'll credit you also.

 


Beginning in 1924, Passenger plates reached the 6-digit limit and began to use an alpha-numeric series.  Such plates started at A-1 to A-9, then A-10 to A-99, eventually reaching A99-999, then the to the B-series followed by the C-series as shown here.  Each alpha series was completed before advancing to the next letter.  By 1926 Passenger plates had extended into the C-series as shown here.  This series reached C78-216 or higher.  This beauty was a John Willard / John Anshant plate seen at a recent ALPCA meet.

 


Much like the plate above, here is another low number plate from the 1930 Passenger alpha-numeric E-series.  Also by 1930 the number of auto registrations resulted in as many as six more alpha-numeric series.  This 6-inch by 10-inch gem was a John Willard / John Anshant plate seen at a recent ALPCA meet.

 


This is a pair of 1933 Passenger plates.  The far left plate is part of Format 2 which ran from A to Z9999.  Some plates that year had the legend reversed such as this plate.  The other shorty plate is part of Format 3 which includes 0A to 9Z999.  This plate has the normal legend.  The far left plate photo is from Tim Gierschick, the 1B is a John Willard / John Anshant plate seen at a recent ALPCA meet.

 


Same plate, before and after, some like the appearance of the aged patina surface, it's also nice to see what this plate looked like when it was new.  This is a Tim Gierschick 1921 Tractor plate, part of a series from E1 to E4-163, with all plates believed to measure 6 inches by 16 inches.

 


Compare these two rare 1917 Trailer plates.  The T494 plate was recently acquired by Clayton Moore.  When compared to a photo of another 1917 Trailer plate belonging to John Willard, there is a noticeable difference in sizes, the T715 plate is known to be 6" x 16". CORRECTION, THE T494 WAS CONFIRMED BY THE OWNER TO MEASURE 14".

Are there any other '17 Trailer images or plates out there?

 

 


6/12/2022 Posting

This first-of-its-kind Presidential Service Badge was recently spotted by Jordan Irazabal.  He actually spotted the plate twice but was unable to get the photo the first time.  Should clarify that this is the first serial numbered plate spotted, previously a personalized was spotted. What is such a badge?  Wiki states that the Presidential Service Badge is an identification badge of the United States Armed Forces which is awarded to members of the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Space Force, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard as well as other members of the Uniformed Services, such as the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, who serve as full-time military staff to the President of the United States.

 


Here's another very rare type.  While PA State Senator plates are seldom spotted, this is the first tag to be seen with the map outline.  This excellent photo is thanks to Bill Young.  With 50 senatorial districts, such plates could run from PA1 to PA50 and 1PA to 50PA for a second vehicle; however many senators choose not to use such plates.

 


At first glance, one might take this for a Pittsburgh Penguins plate with a U.S. Army sticker.  Actually it's a new high U.S. Army (Active Duty) plate spotted by Bruce Bufalini.  Quite a jump — previous high was 00068A/D.   I'm no fan of frames.

 

 


Here's the latest high Repair Towing plate image thanks to Bill Young.  Remember when these were called Repair Service /Towing or Rep Ser / Towing?

 

 


Here's the latest reported Truck high plate, thanks to Bill Young.  After the previous series reached ZTZ-9999, the next plate was ZVA-0000, no ZU-prefix plates were issued.  Vowels are not generally used in position 2 of serial numbers.

 

 


Pretty sure this is a personalized Antique Vehicle plate.  Note that the plate actually reads X, letter 'O', number zero, 1.  In PA letters are slightly smaller than numbers.  In addition, there is no AA00 serial formats on this base.  Photo credit goes to Mike Alfonse.

 

 


At the end of 2020, PA had more than 8,152,000 vehicles registered.  Of that number, some 252,000 had personalized or vanity plates.  Such plates are available in a variety of alpha-numeric combinations of 1 to 7 characters as shown here, as well as most, but not all, plate types.  See this week's Vanity Page for more images.  Thanks to Arthur Levine, my photo, Nick Tsilakis and Grant MacKenzie for the images shown here.

 


This is a 1918 Tractor plate which was recently acquired by Jason Cook.  The original colors were white on black and the size is 6" by 16".  This plate is also a new high, with this being the first one seen above 3000.  There was some discussion as to whether this plate could be a Class 2 Tractor plate.  Unfortunately it appears that registration records for 1918 no longer exist and without records, that question will go unanswered.

 


This may not look like anything special, but to my knowledge this is the first 1928 Y-Class Truck plate photo.  Obviously based on the serial number there were at least 1,938 plates issued, but very few of the heavier classes have survived.  This photo came from Clayton Moore, but plate has now gone to Rob Baran.  Watch for this plate again after cleaning.

 


6/5/2022 Posting

With Memorial Day fresh in our sights, what better plate to lead off with than that of a World War II Veteran plate.  This low numbered plate was spotted by Jaska Börner.  These plate were first issued in 1995.  Why did we wait 50 years from the end of that war?

 

 


Next is a new high U.S. Coast Guard Veteran plate thanks to Jay Embee.  These plates date back to 2009.  The initial batch of these plates was large enough so that plates up to 00700C/G may still have the sticker well, of course more recent vanities will have the map.

 

 


Mike Alfonse spotted this personalized Arizona State University Sun Devils plate.  Can't think of an organizational plate with their headquarters farther from Pennsylvania.  Plate check indicated that there may be at least 60 serial-numbered plates registered.

 

 


Click the link to see more vanity & personalized plates.  Plate shown here is thanks to Arthur Levine.

 

 

 

 

 


However you prefer the images, raw or edited, here is the latest high PA Turnpike Official Use plate.  Thanks to Matt Ciecka for the photo.

 

 


Bill Young captured this new high Person with Disability plate.  This new alpha-numeric format dates back to February of this year.

 

 

 

 


This very nice 1943 Motorboat plate was recently acquired by Clayton Moore.  This plate also establishes a new series  high.  During 1943 plates were not issued to motor vehicles, but they were issued to boats.  These black on yellow plates measured 5⅛ inches by 9½ inches.

 


Mike Alfonse recently acquired this very nice 1924 Passenger plate.  These 6-digit plates are part of Format 3 measuring 6 inches by 15 inches.  This plate also has both bolt holes and strap slots.  This strap slot feature is known to be on plates as high as 566-779, but not seen on higher plates.

 


Here is a very nice, low number 1915 Tractor plate.  These porcelain plates were issued in pairs for 1914 and '15 only.  4 plate sizes were issued that year depending on the number of characters in the serial number, with this plate measuring 6 inches by 10 inches.  This plate photo is thanks to John Willard.

 


5/29/2022 Posting

Was wondering just how many types of motorcycle-size plates are issued in PA.  So here's a list.  Anything missing?  A few newer types are on the street but have not been photographed so far.  Concerning the State Police plate, a lieutenant indicated that PSP Motorcycle plates are in the works.  Click links below photo to see more photos and variations.

Motorcycle

 

Motorcycle Dealer

 

 

Vertical Motorcycle

Moped

 

Moped Dealer

 

 

Let Freedom Ring

 

Motorcycle Person w/ Disability

Distracted Driving Awareness

Honoring our Veterans

Combat Wounded Veteran

Veteran

Antique MC

Classic_MC

Collectible_MC

 

Historic Military MC

Municipal MC

Blue Knights Int'l Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club

 

NO PHOTO

 

Fraternal Order of Police MC

 

NO PHOTO

 

International Association of Fire Fighters MC

 

NO PHOTO

 

State Police? 

See note above.

 

ATV plates not included

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This Save Wild Animals plate was recently acquired by Richard Than.  Apparently there may still be a few of these hiding at some tag agencies.  These were available from 1996 to 4/2013.  This plate with the leading 'Y' as part of the serial number suggests it is close to the high.  The high photo I have is P/Z390A, but a more exhaustive record check indicates that the actual issued high is P/ZZ999B.  There are also many gaps leading up to that number, suggesting that there are still un-issued tags and likely some dead tags as well.

 


Here is a new high Emergency Vehicle plate.  The plate, EV-73397, is on a Paoli Fire Company vehicle and was photographed by Jaska Börner.

 

 

 


Here's another new high, this one is also thanks to Jaska Börner.  The photo is of an IUP or Indiana University of Pennsylvania Alumni Association plate.  This plate type is one of the earliest organizational plates, dating back to 1985.

 


Check out this week's display of vanity & personalized plates.  Plate shown here is from Arthur Levine.

 

 

 

 


Here is a very nicely restored 1917 Passenger plate.  Original colors were white on black.  Three sizes of plates were issued that year depending on the number of characters used.  This plate measures 6" x 14".  This plate has both bolt holes and strap slots. 

 


This is a 1926 Tractor plate thanks to Clayton Moore.  The E prefix stood for Engine, short for Traction Engine, a now archaic term for Tractor.  Click the link above to see additional examples of '26 Tractor plates.

 

 


Here are some recent additions to Tim Gierschick's amazing collection of Tractor plates.  You can never have too many!  Starting from the far left is a 1924 E+3 digit 10" shorty.  By 1928 the letter E was needed for the Passenger series so the Tractor series replaced the E with TE.  So next is a 1929 TE+3 digit 13" plate.  Finally we have these 1932 and 1933 TE2+3 digit 15" plates.

 


5/22/2022 Posting

New organizational plate types, especially from colleges, seems to have almost stopped, then Williamson College of the Trades decided to get into the game.  They are located near Media, PA.  Plate check indicates that they have 10 serial numbered plates on the street.  The sample photo came from their website.

 


Here's the latest Passenger high as reported by Tom Castelli.  Although Bill Stephens reports LYP-7800, no photo.

Keep up to date with all the latest highs with the Highs page

Some plate watchers are wondering when the Passenger MBA- series will hit the street.

 

 

 

 


This is a personalized Combat Action Badge plate recently spotted by Jeff Lesher.  Not going to guess the meaning.  This plate is part of a series of 5 combat-related plates dating back to 2014 all using the C/O suffix.  Newer plates have the map outline.

 


The far left photo shows a personalized U.S. Military Airborne Units plate.  The photo is thanks to Arthur Levine.

The near left plate may look like a normal serial number U.S. Marine Corps Veteran plate but it's actually a personalized plate since the current high is 14243M/C.  The photo is thanks to Bruce Bufalini.

Check out the remainder of this week's vanity & personalized plates.

 


Here's another from the Combat Action series, this one being a Combat Action Ribbon plate.  While it's not a new high, it does help lower the starting point for the map outline.  Thanks to Drew Steitz for the photo.

 

 


Here is a new high Rosedale Technical College, formerly Rosedale Technical Institute.  This plate is the first to be spotted without a sticker well.  The image is thanks to Bruce Bufalini.

 

 


Here's a brand new Porsche Club of America plate.  This plate type dates back to 2002, and a few years later when some organizations made the transition to the graphic style plate on the visitPA base, the Porsche Club choose to stay with the original design.

 


Here is a very nice low number 1955 Motorcycle plate.  Thanks to Drew Steitz for the photo.  That year saw two serial formats, 1 to 9999, followed by A to S38.

 

 


Here is an extraordinarily nice 1954 Passenger plate from Michael Vislocky.  This plate was from a late end of year run and was part of what I call Format 14 which ran from D00A0 to M51B7.  Plates measured 6" x 10¼".

 

 


This is an unusual 1936 Official Use Only plate.  These plates were part of a block of passenger series of numbers from 31-001 to 32-000.  Unlike 6" by 12" passenger plates, these plates measure 6" by 15".  Thanks to Clayton Moore for the photo.

 

 


This very rare 1917 Tractor Dealer plate was recently acquired by Clayton Moore.  Quite a find Clayton!  The TX prefix indicated Tractor Dealer and was used from 1916 through 1930.  A photo of TX12 is also shown by clicking the link above. 

Photos or information about Tractor Dealer plates from 1920, 1921, 1923, 1927 and 1929 are needed.  Also photos and information from 1931 to the early 1950s is almost non-existent.

 


5/15/2022 Posting

First of its kind!  Arthur Levine spotted this never-before-seen Presidential Service Badge plate.  These came about through legislation which amended the vehicle code in February of 2019.  This tag is considered a veterans' plate.  Qualified individuals can purchase using form MV-150.  Several other plates were authorized at the same time, with no plates spotted to date.  These include Legion of Merit and Soldier’s Medal.  Also Veterans of an Allied Foreign Country with one personalized plate spotted.

 


Here's a new high U. S. Air Force Veteran plate thanks to Bruce Bufalini.

 

 


We've seen a steady stream of new high School Bus plates over the past month.  This latest is thanks to Bill Young.

 

 


Here's a new high Limousine plate.  The previous high was LM-31017.

 

 


This new high Motor Home plate from Bill Stephens.  The serial number took quite a jump from the previous high.  It's also nearing the end of the HH series.  The next series will be HJ-00000.  Trivia question: Do you recall the original prefix of the first series of such plates?  Answer: It was HC which stood for House Car, later changed to Motor Home around HD-42000.

 


Here is the lowest number Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. plate spotted so far, thanks to Bill Young.  On the other end of the spectrum, the high is 00253D/S.

 

 

Certainly not one you see every day.  This Marshall University Alumni plate was spotted by Nick Tsilakis.  Marshall is located in Huntington, WV.  The series high on the plate is 00030M/U.

 

 


You would not expect to see a personalized School Vehicle plate as spotted by Bill Stephens.  Legal? Absolutely, many plate types are now available to be personalized.  Some others include Taxi, Commercial Implement of Husbandry, Implement of Husbandry, Farm Truck, Hearing Impaired, Press Photographer, Apportioned Truck (<14,000 lb.), and all 11 Dealer types, and Emergency Vehicle to name some.  Also Antique, Classic, etc.

 

Want to see more vanities & personalized plates?  Check out this week's photos on the Vanity Page.

 


While this is not quite a new high, it is an interesting number.  The Preserve Our Heritage - Railroad plate dates back to 1988, and is the only remaining full graphic PA plate.  It still retains the sticker well, and is not available for personalization.  Thanks to Chris Delbuono for the image.

 


This early Antique Motorcycle plate is an example of the last series of plates with the narrow bolt holes.  It is unknown if this serial progression extended into L00, M00 or N00 series.  Photo from Worthpoint.  Anyone have a plate or a photo from those series?

 

This Antique Motorcycle plate is an example of the first series of plates with the wide bolt holes.  And similar to the question above, we don't know at what point the previous series ended, and therefore, we don't know where this series began.  Photo from Worthpoint.

 

 


5/8/2022 Posting

I want to note that there has been such a strong response to tracking highs, that it has been a challenge to post them all.  At the same time Jordan is listing them on the new highs page.


If it were your choice, which would you choose?  Personally I like the older pre-family of plates look for Severely Disabled Veteran tag.  It has a more patriotic look in my opinion.  Anyway, there is no choice, since late 2021 all Severely Disabled Veteran plates will have the new look.  The far left plate credit goes to Bruce Bufalini, new plate is thanks to Brandon Sowers.  (It may be worth mentioning that those few vehicles using double plates due to a device on the rear of the vehicle for carrying a wheelchair or personal assistive device are authorized to use two plates that are still coming from the older series.)

 


Here is a new high Combat Wounded Veteran or Purple Heart plate, now with the map outline.  The previous high was P/H10472 which had no sticker well.  These plates are ordered in batches of 100, so the addition of the map could have been at 10500, 10600 or 10700.  Thanks to Matt Ciecka for the photo.

 


Here's a great shot of a new high Apportioned Truck plate.  Thanks to Bill Young for the photo.

 

 


Here is a new high Truck plate that has been added this week, also updated on the Highs Page.  Thanks to Bill Young for the video capture.

 

 


And another new high Dealer which took a jump from the previous high of K46-144K, also updated on the Highs Page.  This plate was spotted by Jordan Irazabal on Ferrari Philadelphia's Instagram page.

 


One more high.  Matt Ciecka recently spotted this Person with Disability.  This new serial format was first seen in February of this year.

 

 


On the far left is a new high on the Commonwealth Coat of Arms Passenger base, to the right of that is a new high screen shot of a PennDOT Commercial Vehicle plate.  Thanks to Jay Embee and to Bill Young for the photos.

 


This is a new high National Ski Patrol plate which was spotted by John Fedorchak.  It reads 00287S/P.  These plates have been using the map outline since at least as far back as 00247S/P.  The plate type itself dates back to 2011.

 

 

 


Want to see more vanities & personalized plates? Check out this week's photos on the Vanity Page.

 

 

 


This colorful tag is a prototype plate that was apparently intended to be the next edition of Fire Department plates.  The original FD plates came out in 1968, but they were never issued on the base shown here which I'm guessing could be an '84 or '85 base.  My personal recollection of a fire department I belong to, and which didn't begin operations until 1978, was that for several years all the trucks had FD plates. Based on this, I'm thinking FD plates were issued up to around '84 or '85, at which point Emergency Vehicle plates were issued to fire department vehicles.  Then any remaining FD plates were replaced by Emergency Vehicle tags in 2007.

 


Here's a very nice low number 1971 Tractor plate with a 72 sticker.  The tag was recently acquired by Tim Gierschick.  The 1971 to '76 run was the first to use the TR prefix, although it was used again on the 1977 issue.  The series high is TR-50998.

 


Some great Truck plates this week, starting with this 1934 Class S with SA000 format.  I had not documented this format previously, only listing S000A, S00A0 and S0A00.  Therefore, this plate may be considered a new high.  Thank you Brandon Sowers for the photo.

 


Next up is this 1955 VZ-Class Truck plate.  If you are familiar with PA truck plate history, you know that two-axle trucks were issued plates from the R through Z series.  And three-axle trucks were issued plates from the RZ to ZZ series.  Not as many of these 2-letter prefix plates were issued and even fewer have survived.  This plate measures 6" by x 10¼".  Clayton Moore snagged this great example.

 


But wait there's more, including this 1956 VZ-Class with an identical serial number as the '55 above.  Again this is a very rare three-axle plate.  1956 saw plate sizes standardized to 6" by 12".  Again thanks to Clayton Moore for sharing this fine example.

 


The far left 1964 - 66 VZ-Class Truck plate photo is thanks to Jeff Lesher and was previously displayed, the near left plate is a newly acquired plate of Clayton Moore.  They both represent the period from 1964 to 1967.  The VZ0-65A appears to be a new high, with the A suffix suggesting that few such plates were issued.  Again thanks to Clayton Moore for sharing this example.

 


5/1/2022 Posting

Please note, if you are sending new highs to this website, please send to both

John McDevitt at jmcd1@ptd.net and Jordan Irazabal at jordan.irazabal@gmail.com

or post them to Keystone State Plates on Facebook.

New highs that are shown on this homepage, are also on the HIGHS page, and generally on the history pages.


Here is a new high Bus plate recently spotted by Bill Young.  These plates have been using the map outline since BA-81900.  Click this link to see more Bus plate history dating back to 1924.

 


This is a new high Truck plate from Bill Young.  The plate number reads ZTX-4263.  The map outline was added at ZKJ-0000.  Click this link to see more Truck plate history dating back to 1914.

 


 

This Preserve Our Heritage or Railroad plate is another new high.  It's part of the 4th serial progression.  This Special Fund plate dates back to December of 1998 and is the only remaining full-graphic plate.  This photo is thanks to Jordan Irazabal.

 


Here is a new high within the group of Dealer plates still retaining the sticker well.  The lowest point without the sticker well is K46-673K.  We also know that based on a warehouse inventory report that the plate run from the batch shown here ended at K46-499K, with a new batch starting at K46-500K.  Thanks to Jordan Irazabal for the photo.

 


Bill young spotted a new School Bus high on the bus with SC-89662.  Then later he also spotted SC-89773.  So we have two new highs in the same week.

 

 

 

 


On 4/17 we posted a photo of Abington Fire Company 00006A/T, the plate shown here was supplied by Bob Connison, and is the low number.  The photo-documented high for this series is 00027A/T, and the registered high is 00028A/T.

 


This is a Harley Owners Group vanity plate spotted by Bob Connison.  Such plates can have up to 5 characters plus the H/D prefix.  This plate does have the map outline.

 


Here is a personalized U.S. Submarine Veterans, Inc. plate.  While this may appear to be a Military Veterans' plate, it is actually an organizational plate.  This plate type dates back to 2005.  Thanks to Bruce Bufalini for the photo.

 


Here is a low-number Press Photographer plate from Julian Marrero.  It has been my understanding that such plates were always issued sequentially and that  traditionally the series began at PP10, although a couple older plates were issued with PP4.  In the case of these modern plates with numbers like, 3, 7, and the letter I, they are believed to be personalized.  The plate shown here also has the map outline.  One unique feature about PP plates is that they never used an identifying legend such as Press or Photographer.

 

 


Want more vanities / personalized plates? Check out this week's photos on the Vanity Page.

 


Here is a 3-digit 1923 Motorcycle plate.  1- to 3-digit plates measured 4½ inches by 6 inches, while 4- and 5-digit plates measured 4½ inches by 8 inches.  Anyone have a 1- or 2-digit plate?  The series high is believed to be 19786.  Thanks to Clayton Moore for the photo.

 


This is a 1926 Motorcycle plate.  Like the '23 plate above, these were also made in 2 sizes depending on the number of digits.  Does anyone have a 1-, 2- or 3-digit plate?  Thanks to Clayton Moore for the photo.

 


4/24/2022 Posting

This past week has been another challenging one for me, spending much of it in the hospital.  So this will be a short update.  Also I know this website has been down part of the time.  Jordan Irazabal is in the process of moving the site to another hosting service.  Stay tuned.

 


Here is a brand new Classic Vehicle plate photo from Clayton Moore.  The latest change to these plates has been the addition of the map outline back at C40900.  To qualify for such a plate, the vehicle must be at least 15 years old, maintained in original or restored condition.  The vehicle is no longer subject to emissions inspection.

 


Here's a new high Official Use plate thanks to Brandon Sowers.  This is part of the non-passenger series and the serial number is a continuation of the old white on blue fully embossed plates.  Note there are also agency specific Official Use plates for PennDOT, PA State Police and PA Turnpike, all of which use their own agency logo and number series as opposed to the generic commonwealth coat of arms on the plate shown here.

 


Here's a recent Amateur Radio plate photo from Jordan Irazabal.  Such plates date back to 1956 and can have A, K, N or W as the call letter prefix.  The number 3 indicated the region which includes Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware.  Click this link to see more Ham Radio info.

 

 


This is a Trailer Vanity, kind of rare, and indistinguishable from a passenger vanity.  Of course the give away is that it's on a trailer.  Vanities are also available for motor homes, and trucks with a registered gross weight of 14,000 pounds or less.  Personalized plates are also eligible for motorcycles, certain commercial vehicles and certain special organizational tags.  This photo is thanks to Julian Marrero and was forwarded by Jordan Irazabal.

 


Want more vanities?  Arthur Levine has provided a dozen new vanity plate shots.  Check 'em out on the Vanity Page.

 

 

 

 

 

 


This is a low number 1930 Class R Truck plate.  1930 truck plates saw a departure from the much more common R through ZZ weight classes that was used before and after the 1930 run.  Apparently it fell out of favor and returned to R - ZZ system in later years.  Anyway, for 1930, R-class plates were designated by 00AA to 999FZ, making this a low-number plate.  Thanks to Clayton Moore for the photo.

 


Here is a nice example of a low-numbered 1953 Format 13 Passenger plate.  Format 13 was an overflow series using D000A to P999Z.  The reason for starting at D000A was that the A000A, B000A and C000A series were reserved for three Dealer types.  Also going beyond the P999Z series would have encroached on the truck series.  Thanks to Clayton Moore for the image.

 


4/17/2022 Posting

Here we have a nice new Passenger high to go with the recently added Highs page.  This plate photo is thanks to Bill Young.  Eventually this series will end at LZZ-9999, and then advance to MBA-0000.

 

 


And here's another new high from Bill Young.  This is an Apportioned Truck plate in the AH-series which was first spotted in December of 2020.

 

 


How about a new School Bus high.  This image was provided by Bruce Bufalini.  The most recent change to these plates was the addition of the map outline which was first spotted on SC-83361, but is believed to have started at SC-83200 based on a warehouse inventory report.

 


This is a new high Share The Road plate thanks to Bruce Sakson.  This is considered a Special Fund plate.  Note that this plate still retains the sticker well.  A 2016 warehouse inventory shows an order of plates BK00501 to BK00800, which includes the plate shown here, and likely all still have sticker wells.  The cost of such a plate is $40.

 


Unlike the Special Fund plate above, this Let Freedom Ring tag is considered an optional plate.  A legislative act approved this Semiquincentennial registration plate, similar to the Bicentennial Plate, with the phrase “Let Freedom Ring - 250 years”, for issue up through 2026.  The plate shown here is a personalized edition with the 1776 in place of a 5-digit serial number.  Thanks to Bill Koneski for the photo.  There is also a Motorcycle edition of this plate available.

 


This is the lowest number spotted on an Abington Fire Company plate.  These plates date back to 2010 so the validation sticker would be expected.  The registered high is 00028A/T.  Thanks to David Dohan for providing the photo.

 


When first generation yellow on blue base organizational plates were reissued on the www base, they were on a number for number basis.  After re-plating, new requests for plates were generally issued from a higher number block, which the plate shown here represents.  Photo is thanks to Jeff Lawson.  Click this W & J College link to see a breakdown of plate history.  W & J or Washington & Jefferson College has a totally new graphic as of February, so far no plates have been spotted.

 


See these and several other personalized plates on the Vanity Page.  The NAGS HED and the Navy plate are thanks to Bruce Bufalini, the Expeditionary Forces is from Matt Ciecka, and the Person w/ Disability is from Tom Roberts via Drewski.  The non-passenger types are cross-listed in their respective plate types.

 


This is a new high number 1920 Motorcycle for this website, but not the recorded high which was 23981.  All 4- and 5-digit plates measure 4½" by 8", while 1- to 3-digit plates measure 4½" by 6".  This photo is thanks to Clayton Moore.  Anyone have a 1- to 3-digit plate or photo?

 


Except for the Governor's #1 plate, the far left is the lowest 1912 Passenger plate I have seen.  Like the Governor's plate this plate measures 6 inches by 8 inches.  This photo is thanks to John Willard.  By contrast, the 59307 plate measures 6 inches by 14 inches and is close to the recorded high of 59365.  Plates were made by the Brilliant Manufacturing Co., Phila., PA.

 


4/10/2022 Posting

This is a new high Michigan State Alumni plate courtesy of Brendan Sherry.  While the plate may be the latest high spotted, the 9-17 sticker suggests that it's been around for awhile.  Plate check shows a registered high 10080M/S, so likely plates without sticker well / with map outline are likely.

 


Here is another new high, this one from Mike Alfonse showing a Royersford Fire Department plate.  These plates date back to 2019 and have always had the map outline.

 

 


Here is another plate photo from Mike Alfonse.  This National Ski Patrol image helps to lower the starting point for plates with the map outline.  The current high without the map outline is 00242S/P.  This plate type dates back to 2011.

 


Obviously plates in the under 100 crowd are scarce.  Bruce Bufalini recently spotted this 62 plate in his travels.  Today such plates are considered vanities, while at one time they were reserved for state officials and dignitaries.  Plates below 10 are still considered to be under the Governor's control.  Plates as low as 3 have been spotted on the www base.  Also single letter plates covering the entire alphabet are on the road.

 

 


Here's another vanity in use.  This one spotted by Bill Young.

See more personalized plates on this week's Vanity Page.

 

 


Amateur Radio or Vanity?  The K3QNT is an amateur radio call sign, but the -M makes this plate a vanity.  Most years after 1987 would have a plate legend reading Amateur Radio Operator or Amateur Radio.  Bruce Bufalini points out that with the current plate pricing, it would be crazy to get this as a vanity vs amateur radio, since the amateur radio plate is only $11, vs $85 for a vanity.  Plate image from Worthpoint.

 


I reorganized Disabled Veteran plates section by correcting the starting date to 1977, based on data from Eric Tanner.   Also combined the DV-0000 series with the DV-00000, since it was a continuous run without other changes.  The far left plate is an example of an early plate with a Jul 1981 sticker.  The other images above were also added as examples of a Format 2 plate, followed by a pair of Format 3 plates.  Format 2 runs from DV-22000 to DV-24999 and had the sticker well moved to the left bottom from the previous format.  Format 3 runs from DV-25000 to DV-27999 and has the legends reversed.  The DV-22 and DV-26 plates are from Worthpoint, while the others are my photos.

 


Last, but definitely not least, is this 1909 Porcelain Passenger plate from Tim Gierschick.  Wow!  This plate is 113 years old and is the lowest number plate known from that year.  The series that year ran from 1 to 34299, and were made by Ing-Rich also known as Ingram Richardson of Beaver Falls, PA.  This plate measures 6 inches by 7 inches with the legend on the right.  Plates starting at 100 had the legend on the top and were 6½ high.

 


4/3/2022 Posting.  I should note that Jordan Irazabal is taking an active role in this website.


Figure this out — at the time these Let Freedom Ring plates were first issued, 00087F/R was that plate, then later, plate check indicated that 00051F/R was issued, but none lower.  Matt Ciecka then stepped up and requested this plate as a vanity.  Go figure!

 

 


Here is the first image of a serial-numbered Keystone Elk Country Alliance.  The organization has had plates on the road since late 2021.  Previously a couple vanities were spotted.  Thanks to John Clark for the photo.  This plate is also considered the current high.

 

 


This new pair of Blue Knights Int'l Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club plate photos is thanks to Mike Natale.  To my knowledge this is the first photo of a motorcycle-size organizational plate.  Although they have been spotted on the Distracted Driving Awareness motorcycle plates and Honoring Our Veterans motorcycle plates.  And according to plate check, there are 4 Fraternal Order of Police motorcycle plates registered, and 36 International Association of Fire Fighters motorcycle plates.  The only shortcoming of these motorcycle plates is that the organizational symbol is reduced to the size of a postage stamp.

 


This plate is not a new high 4-H Youth Program but it helps to identify or lower the point where the map outline was added.  The spotted high with the sticker well is 4/H00021.  These are rare plates with only 38 serial-numbered plates in use.  Thanks to Zachary Bent for the photo.

 

 


This is a new high (Masonic) Blue Lodge plate, and the first actual photo of a serial numbered plate with the map outline.  These are one of the earliest organizational plates dating back to 1984.  Plate photo credit goes to Matt Ciecka.

 

 


This is not a new plate type, but an update from Jordan Irazabal shows that Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine now has plates 00001L/E thru 00005L/E in use.

 

 


You may recall that these Support Your Zoo plates evolved from the Save Wild Animals series when the full graphic was replaced by the scaled down tiger photo seen here.  Despite that, this personalized plate is definitely eye-catching.  It also appears to be the first of these plates to have the map outline.  Thanks to Bill Houser for the photo.

See more personalized plates on this week's Vanity Page.

 


Here is a new low in the new Person with Disability series.  This series started at A0000PD.  Plate photo credit goes to Matt Ciecka.

 

 

 


3/27/2022 Posting

Here is a low and a high of the Honoring Our Women Veterans series.  While these are Special Fund plates, and not veterans' plates, they do support the Veterans Trust Fund.  The 00101W/V is thanks to Brandon Sowers and the 00219W/V is thanks to Bruce Bufalini.  A record check does show a 00001W/V registered, which is likely a reserve issue.

 


Here is a new high Combat Wounded Veteran (or Purple Heart) plate photo thanks to Tim Martin.  This is the first one spotted without the sticker well.  The previous high was P/H10382 still with the sticker well.  It appears likely that this change took place at P/H10400 since these plates are produced in batches of 100.

 


Here is a new high Severely Disabled Veteran plate in the Format 4A series.  This series only extended to D/V98999, plates in the D/V99000 series were reserved for dual plate use for vehicle owners that have a device on the rear of the vehicle for carrying a wheelchair or personal assistive device.  Such users are authorized to be issued two plates since the assistive device and carrier may block visibility of the vehicle mounted plate.  The new series started at 80000D/V on the visitPA base.  This photo is thanks to Bruce Bufalini.

 


Here is a new high Expeditionary Forces Veteran plate.  These plates date back to 1995 and have seen several variations over the years.  They have had the map outline at least as far back as E/F3334.  This photo is thanks to Bruce Bufalini with some minor editing by Jordan Irazabal of the TheDelaware3000.org.

 


Here is a new high Motorcycle plate thanks to Preston Turner.  As with most PA plates, the alpha character in the most left-hand position is the last to advance, in this case the "W".  This series will eventually extend to 9ZZ99.

 

 


This Permanent Trailer plate is another new high thanks to Preston Turner.

 

 


Check out this Corvette Club of Delaware Valley vanity plate from Matt Ciecka

 

 

See about a dozen more other personalized plates on this week's Vanity Page.

 

  


Thanks to Jordan Irazabal, it appears that Citizen's Hose Fire Company has 4 plates in use.  We have almost no information on this plate, even the fire company name appears in more than one location in PA.

 


The earliest Combat Wounded Veteran plates were yellow on blue and used the tag line, Purple Heart.  Then they were replaced in the early 90s with the version seen here with bluish purple on white base with red legend.  This plate appears to be a series high on that base.  This photo came from Worthpoint.

 


The far left Square and Round Dancers plate struck me as odd with only a 4-digit serial number as compared to the other plates from that series.  It does have a 7-94 sticker, so could a batch of 4-digit plates have been issued?  That photo came from Worthpoint.

 


Here is a very nice porcelain 1915 Dealer plate photo thanks to Jeff Lesher.  This series is believed to run from X1 to X5093 or higher.  Plate sizes varied according to the number of characters in the serial number.  They include 6" x 8", 6" x 10", 6"x 12" as shown here, and 6" x 14".

 

 


Here is a nice specimen of a 3-digit 1916 Passenger plate.  This series ran from 1 to 999 on the 6-inch by 11-inch base shown here.  Each additional digit increased the length of the plate with 13, 14 and 16-inch plates also used.  This plate photo is thanks to Jeff Hinkle.

 

 


3/21/22

Below is my update that I had planned to post on 3/13, unfortunately a medical issue that I had been dealing with took a painful turn, ended up in ER, and spent last 10 days in hospital.  Home now, but long road ahead, will try to keep this website going as I can.  Thanks for the well wishes.

 


Two weeks ago we got our first glimpse of these new Pennsylvania State Police Official Use plates.  Then Jay Embee snapped a photo of this P/A0056V plate in use on a new Ford Explorer from the Bloomsburg barracks (N2).  I had also contacted PSP Headquarters, and a lieutenant there was kind enough to send the photo of the P/A0220V. 

These plates shown here are for use on passenger vehicles.  Based on other Official Use plates, there will likely be non-passenger plates that will be formatted as V0000P/A.

But wait, there's more!  The lieutenant indicated that PSP Motorcycle plates are in the works.

 

 


You knew it wouldn't be long until a plate was photographed with so many plate watchers on the move.  Matt Ciecka provided the first look at this new serial format Person with Disability plate, A0037PD.  As mentioned last week, the previous format reached the end of the sequence at 97999PD.  (Plates from 98000PD to 99999PD are reserved for vehicles where two plates are issued due to an assistive device mounted to the rear of the vehicle obscuring the vehicle mounted plate.)  Vanity check shows A0099PD as the current high as of 3/7.

 


The Gold Star Family plate, probably the most somber military designation.  This plate shown here was spotted by Bill Stephens, and is the first plate spotted with the map outline.  The previous high mark was GSF0748.  This plate type dates back to 2006 and uses a unique 3-letter prefix.

 


While we're on the subject of some recent highs, here is a new Passenger plate.  This one is thanks to John Fedorchak.

 

 

 


School Vehicle plate SV-30674 was spotted by Bruce Bufalini on 3/1/22.  This is a new high.  Photo not available.

 


This is a Flyers Charity vanity plate.  It also bares the latest legend of Flyers Charity legend being singular and without the word Wives.  Confusing — yes!  Thanks to Matt Ciecka for the photo.

 


See several other personalized plates on this week's Vanity Page.

 


This is a very nice Format 7 Antique Motorcycle plate.  While this plate format is no longer issued, they are still considered valid, with many still in use, and preferred by many bike owners.  Format 7 includes 0A0 to 9Z9.  This plate measures 4½" by 8".  Thanks to Devan Ciemiewicz for the photo.

 


These early, full size, ATV Dealer plates are essentially the same except for the legend along the bottom of the plate.  The first generation plate on the far left reads DEPT. OF ENV. RES. while plates from the next generation read DCNR Department of Conservation & Natural Resources.  I'm hoping that someone can share an image that would help narrow the point where this change took place.  Both plate photos are from Worthpoint.

 


This porcelain 1915 Tractor plate is a recent addition to Tim Gierschick's amazing collection.  This plate measuring 6 inches by 12 inches, was one of four sizes used that year depending on the numbers of characters in the serial number.  This year and 1914 were the only years that tractor plates were issued in pairs.

 


Here is a very rare 1925 Tractor Dealer plate.  As rare as it is, there is also a photo of TX-25 which came from Jake Eckenrode, the photo here came from Worthpoint.  Presumably the series started at E-1.  It is not known how many were issued.

 


This was a needed Format 5 1956 Trailer plate.  This format goes from 000A to 999Z and is one of six serial progressions used that year.  In 1956 all except motorcycle plates were standardized to 6 inches by 12 inches.  This is a Worthpoint image.

 


3/6/2022 Posting

A friendly reminder to those who have emailed me at John@PAPL8.com in the past, please use jmcd1@ptd.net for future emails.

 


Certainly one you don't see on the street, but they are seen at motorcycle events on occasion.  This unused plate is one of the newer style Classic Motorcycle plates that were first seen in 2015.  So far only C/L0977 and vanity C/LLFXDX have been spotted in the new series.  The image is thanks to Devan Ciemiewicz.

 


There has been a discussion on Facebook about a new format for Person with Disability plates.  The previous format reached the end of the sequence at 97999PD.  (Plates from 98000PD to 99999PD are reserved for vehicles where two plates are issued due to an assistive device mounted to the rear of the vehicle obscuring the vehicle mounted plate.)  The new serial format is A0000PD.  Several have been spotted but not photographed.  Vanity check shows A0099PD as the current high as of 2/28.

 


Check out this week's Vanity Page to see the display of more plates, including this yellow on blue vanity still on the road, from Bruce Bufalini.  Also this U.S. Army Veteran vanity plate from Bill Southwick.  And a couple others thanks to Tee Adams, Arthur Levine, H. Kelly and Bill Ceravola.

 

 

 


Here is the first of 5 new fire-related organizational plates.  This one being Big Run Area Volunteer Fire Company.  It appears that no plates are in use yet.  Format will be 00001B/R.  The organization is located in Big Run, which is not far from Punxsutawney, PA.

 


Next up is this Crystal Fire Department prototype.  It appears that no plates are in use yet.  Format will be 10001F/D.  The organization is located in St. Marys, PA.

 

 


Continuing next is this Marshalls Creek Fire Company prototype.  It appears that no plates are in use yet.  Format will be 20001M/C.  The organization is located in Marshalls Creek, PA.

 

 


Moving on next is this Rothsville Volunteer Fire Company prototype.  It appears that there are currently 8 plates in use.  Format will be R/F00001.  The organization is located in Lititz, PA.

 

 


Next up is this Upper Gwynedd Township Fire Department prototype.  It appears that no plates are in use yet.  Format will be U/G00001.  The organization is located in Lansdale, PA.

 

 


This trio of 1951 Bus plates shows the numerical progression.  The first character is the letter "O" and the number progressed from 1 to 9999.  The O13 is from Clayton Moore, O155 is from Jerry McCoy, and the O9901 is a Worthpoint plate.  Still need a photo from the OA000 format.

 


These are part of the alpha-numeric series of 1926 Passenger plates.  While most plates in that series used a dash separator, the far left plate does not.  Don't know if it's one of, or part of a group.  The photo was from Worthpoint, the plates with the dash were from Greg and Peg from Aged2PerfectionStore1 on Ebay.

 


2/27/2022 Posting

It appears that marked PA State Police vehicles will finally have their own agency-specific plates.  Dave Singer posted the far left photo on Facebook.  Bill Young noticed the plates with what appears to be the PSP logo.  The number series so far runs from P/A00001V to P/A 0200V by way of vanity check.  Don't know if these are actually on the road yet.  These were spotted at K & C Communications in Swatara Twp. where that region's PA State Police Unit communication work is done.  The tag legend is uncertain.  Hopefully we will get a better shot soon.

 


Here is a new high Apportioned Truck plate, recently spotted by Bruce Bufalini.  The AH-series was first spotted in December of 2020.  Plate check shows the registered high as actually being in excess of AH-23100.  So some 23,000 plates have been issues in about 14 months, or roughly 1,643 plates per month.

 


Here is a new Gettysburg 1863 - PA Monuments plate from Bruce Sakson.  These are part of the Special Fund series which dates back to late 2014.  Interesting that 7+ years after their introduction, the plates are still wearing the sticker recess.  It looks like the initial batch of plates was 4,000, so that feature may be around for a while.

 


This Blackthorn Rugby Football Club was added a few weeks ago as a new organizational plate, and now we have a prototype image.  The format will be B/R00001 as shown here.  No plates in use yet.  They are based in Horsham PA, Montgomery County. 

 


The Mansfield University plate is getting a new look.  The original plate is on the far left, with a prototype of the new plate next to it.  It is unknown if the new look will replace the original or not, or if any are in use.

 

 


The Washington & Jefferson College plate is also getting a facelift.  The original plate is on the far left, with a prototype of the new plate next to it.  It is unknown if the new look will replace the original or not.

 

 


We knew in late December 2021 that the Eddington Fire Company had a plate program, but no prototype or actual plate images were available at the time.  A plate check indicated that they had 3 plates in use at the time and still do.  Their serial format is E/D00001  They are located in Bensalem, PA.

 


Like the plate above, we knew in late December 2021 that the West Lake Fire Department had a plate program, but no prototype or actual plate images were available at the time.  A plate check indicated that they now have 9 plates in use.  Their serial format is W/F00001  They are located in Erie, PA.

 


Check back next week for the addition of 6 new fire department organizational plate types.

 


Check out this week's Vanity Page to see the display of more plates.  This week's plates are thanks to Arthur Levine and Danny Schell.

 

 

 

 


This 1940 Dealer was part of a group of plates that Michael Vislocky recently acquired, and it is a previously unlisted Dealer format with the 'X' in position fourth (now Format 4).  Previously Dealer plates were known to use the first, second and third positions.  Plate measures 6" by 12".  Looking for any 1940, 4-digit, 10" Dealer plates.

 


Here is a 1942 Dealer plate with a 1943 tab attached.  This 10-inch shorty is a Format 4 plate with the X in the fourth position.  Click the link to see a Format 4 plate with 5 characters such as 160X6 measuring 12 inches.  Thanks to Michael Vislocky for the use of these photos.

 

 


2/20/2022 Posting

At this point in time I'm entering a period of uncertainty with my health.  I'm not sure how long I can maintain this website, so at some point in the future, Jordan Irazabal, the ALPCA PA archivist, has graciously agreed to take it on.  Effective immediately, please send any personal or plate related emails to me jmcd1@ptd.net or to Jordan at jordan.irazabal@gmail.com.  Please do not use my john@papl8s.com email.

 


Here's a new high Passavant Memorial Homes Family of Services.  The previous high was 10037P/M, so this is a pretty good jump.

 

 


Here is a new high Penn State Alumni Association plate recently spotted by Jordan Irazabal.  This plate program was one of the earliest organizational plate programs dating back to 1985.  A Penn State University plate is also available as an organizational plate.  As many as 10 states offer Penn State plates.  Of course there is also the Penn State Official plate for university-owned vehicles.

 


The Pennsylvania College of Technology plate is getting a new look.  The original plate is on the far left, with a prototype of the new plate next to it.  It is unknown if the new look will replace the original or not.  This college is a Penn State affiliate.

 


Here is a new high Trailer plate thanks to Clayton Moore.  The use of the map outline started at XKY-0000, and were first seen in late January 2018.

 

 


Here's a new high Truck plate, or at least it was as of 2/9.  Thanks to Bruce Bufalini for this photo.  Just out of curiosity a check of licenseplate.cc website listed  ZTZ-3859 as the high.  Plate check indicates that the number has not been reached yet.  Someone is sending fictitious highs to that site.

 


Check out this week's vanity page to see the display of more plates.  This plate is thanks to Arthur Levine.  Check out 7 additional photos thanks to Arthur Levine, Mike Alfonse and Devon Ciemiewicz.

 

 

 

 

 


Here is what appears to be a 1914 Tractor plate on a Groton Tractor.  The plate looks like E2## with the final 2 digits hard to identify.  This photo came from the Spalding & Rhodes Steam Tractor Encyclopedia.  The image was sent by Jason Cook.  The link above will take you to Tractor plates by year.  Click the image to the left to go to the Older Plates in Use page where the image can be further enlarged.

 

 

 


This 1941 Tractor plate is from a group shot of newly acquired plates from Tim Gierschick.  All 1941 tractor plates measured 6 inches by 12 inches.  In that year, tractor plates are known to go from 0001 to as high as 9997, but could they have progressed into the A000 series?

 

 


This 1942 Tractor plate is also from a group shot of newly acquired plates from Tim Gierschick.  This is also a 6-inch by 12-inch plate.  We know for sure that there was an alpha-numeric run that year that progressed at least as high as C424.

 

 


This is a needed photo of a Format 2 1945 Tractor plate.  Format 1 was all-numeric 0001 to 9999, then Format 2 from A000 to B572, with B572 being the high.  Plates measure 6 inches by 11 inches.  This photo is from Worthpoint.

 

 


2/13/2022 Posting

Here's one we haven't seen before.  This personalized Transporter plate was spotted by Rob Baran.  The DT prefix is required, and up to 5 additional characters are permitted.  This is also the first Transporter plate spotted with the map outline.

 


This is a brand new Combat Infantryman Badge from Jonathan Ortman.  It is also a new series high.  This plate is part of a series of 5 combat-related tags that were released in 2014.  The addition of the map outline was first seen on 20179C/O; earlier plates still used stickers.

 


Here is a new high Duquesne University plate which was spotted by Bruce Bufalini.  These plates date back to 1991 on the yellow on blue base, and were then reissued on a number-for-number basis on the www base in 2001.  The plates moved to the graphic base in 2007, and finally the plate shown here appears not to have the sticker well.

 


Here is another new high thanks to Bruce Bufalini, this one being a Repair Towing plate.  The previous high was RT-74993.  These plates date back to 1984 when the earliest legend read REP/SER TOWING and the prefix was RS, later this was changed to REPAIR TOWING.  Plates on the www base started at RT-20000.  The reason for RT-20000 instead of RT-00000 was that Rails-to-Trails Conservancy had the RT-00000 number block.

 


Check out this week's vanity page to see the display of several more plates.  This plate is thanks to Tee Adams.  Check out 7 additional photos from John Kerestes, Arthur Levine and Tee Adams.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are the ABCs of 1924 to 1929 Passenger plates.  The far left shows the plates stacked in a group.  Above are the same plates as individual photos.  1924 was the first year for passenger plates to use an alpha-numeric serial format.  Notice that with each succeeding year, an additional letter was needed to meet the demands of the ever increasing number of passenger vehicles.  Also note that beginning in 1926, letters were smaller than numbers.  It should be noted that the alpha character is the last character to advance.  Links to plate galleries: 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928 & 1929.

Thanks to Rob Baran for these photos.

 

 


Finally snagged a photo of a 1950 Format 3, 4-character Passenger plate.  This series ran from 1A00 to 9Z999 so both 4 and 5-character plates with 5 characters being more plentiful.  All 1950 Passenger plates measured 6" by 11", and expired 3-31-51  This plate photo is thanks to Worthpoint.

 


These are vinyl Snowmobile Dealer stickers from 1978 and 1995.  They are issued annually with an expiration of May 31 of the year of the sticker.  You may recall 1974 Snowmobile Dealers used metal tags similar to motorcycle plates at the time.  Since then, only stickers have been issued.  These are thanks to Jeff Lesher.  I'm still in need of a number of such stickers.

 


This is a special event cardboard plate from the Westinghouse Family House Golf Tournament, held in May of 1994.  The event took place at The Club at Nevillwood.  Thanks to Jeff Lesher for the photo. 

Looking for a Lady Keystone Open, from 1989 if anyone has one and can snap a photo.

 


2/6/2022 Posting

New organizational plates are few and far between today, but the Blackthorn Rugby Football Club is listing one on their website.  Unfortunately no images or prototype designs were shown.  The format appears to be B/R00001, also available personalized.  At the present no serial numbered plates have been issued.

 


This Action for Animals Humane Society plate photo helps to narrow down the changeover point for the addition of the map outline.  This plate program dates back to 2012.  The registered high for this series is 10072H/S.  Thanks to Bruce Bufalini for the photo.

 

 


This Girl Scouts of the USA is a new high, but not by much.  The previous high was 00075G/S.  Plate check shows the current registered high as 00079G/S.  The pictured plate still retains the sticker well.  These plates date back to 2008.  This plate photo was spotted by Jaska Börner.

 

 


Here are the "haves and the have-nots" of Presque Isle Partnership plates.  The far left plate, 01120P/I, with the map outline, was added in November of 2017, and the 01142P/I, also with the map, was added in September of 2018.  The 01130P/I photo, without both the map and sticker well was recently provided by Bruno Hobbies and Deals.  The 01120P/I came from Steve Ondik and the 01142P/I from Barefoot Jaime.

 


Here is another new high, this one being a Ringing Hill Fire Company plate, still with a sticker well.  These date back to 2009.  The plate availability tool shows 00036R/H as the registered high.  This plate photo is thanks to Mike Alfonse.

 

 


Check out this week's vanity page to see the display of several more plates.  This plate is thanks to Tee Adams.  Check out 8 additional photos from John Kerestes, Arthur Levine, H. Kelly and Tee Adams.

 

 

 

 


Rich Gullo's wife found this far left photo in a family album.  This photo was taken in Harlansburg, PA in 1915.  With the photo cropped and enlarged, to the right of the girl you can see the last 4 numbers of the license plate as 6330.  Or is there another digit or something else behind the girl's left arm?  In any case, the plate is likely a porcelain 1915  Passenger plate.

 

 


Here is another old plate in use.  This one being a 1937 V-Weight Class Truck tag.  The V-class consists of only a single serial progression of V000A, with all such plates measuring 6" by 12", although some 6 character R- and S-class plates were 6" by 15".  Richard Krause provided this great photo he got from his friend Steve Briand who retired after a long career with N.E. Telephone Co.  The truck is a rare late 1930's Autocar COE crew cab in phone company service, sporting a 1937 PA plate.  Click the truck photo to see Plates in Use page.

 


One of the goals of this website has been to show examples of as many serial progressions as possible for each year and type.  And so, these 1952 Truck plates help fill the one remaining gap for the R-Weight Class and the one for the S-Weight Class plates.  These plates measure 6-inches by 11-inches.  The R class photo is from Worthpoint and S class is thanks to Rob Baran.

 


1/30/2022 Posting

This week I received a notice from Ned Flynn, that Verdon Rustine had passed away at the age of 95.  His obituary lists his date of passing as January 9.  Verdon was a very long time ALPCA member, and very much a gentleman.  I had the pleasure of meeting him on several occasions at local meets.  Rest in peace Verdon.

 


Here is a new Passenger high just received by Richard Than.  Once this series hits LZZ-9999, the next series will start at MBA-0000.

 

 


Last week I posted Dealer plate K44-701K which helped narrow the point of the changeover from those with the sticker well, to those without.  The lowest plate spotted with the map outline was K47-351K.  Now thanks to Preston Turner we narrow that gap even further with K44-782 with the sticker well, and K46-637K without.  Also, from a 7/17 report, a new batch of plates started at K46-500K which is believed to be the actual point at which the sticker wells were removed.  Note: I made a correction to last week's posting.

 


It may not be a beauty, but it is kind of rare.  The Repossessor plate type dates back to about 1984 on the yellow on blue base, then reissued on the www base starting at RE-05000 in September of 1999.  The observed high is RE-06521, still on the www base.  According to the Annual Report of Registrations, at the end of 2020 there were only 329 such plates in use.  Thanks to Jeff Lawson for the photo.

 


Sorry, no vanity page postings this week.

 


They ain't pretty, but these 1947 R Weight Class and S Weight Class plates do help to fill photo gaps for those classes.  The R plate represents the first of 5 serial progressions, while the S plate represents the second of 4 serial progressions.  The plates measure 6 inches by 11 inches.  The photo source was Worthpoint.  Still need a couple of U-, Y- and Z-class photos.

 


The first 1949 R-Weight Class Truck plate and the S-Class Truck are better images so they are replacing previous images.  The second R-Class plate is a new image that fills the R0A00 gap.  All '49 truck plates were 6 inches by 11 inches, and were issued in pairs.  These are all Worthpoint images.

 


On the far left is a moving van with what appears to be a 1954 Z-Weight Class Truck plate in use.  That plate appears to read Z940G.  Next to it is a plate photo with Z581L as a close-up example of a similar plate.  Click the truck photo to see a larger image.  The photo of the truck with the plate in use is thanks to Rob Baran, while the example plate is thanks to John Willard.

 


Originally I had this photo labeled as a 1954 ZZ-Weight Class Truck plate based on the year of the truck,  however, after comparing this plate with other '54 10¼” wide plates and with '56 12" plates, and noting the narrow and wide map borders respectively, this appears to be a '56 ZZ-Class.  There are other differences including the alignment of the 5 in the date with the first Z suggest that is a '56.  I reached out to Eric Tanner, Jordan Irazabal and Rob Baran for their take on the matter; all agreed that the plate was a 1956.  This plate also establishes a new serial progression of ZZ0A0, previously ZZ plates were only known in the ZZ00A series.

 

 


This pair of tractors shows their plates on the front.  I'm suggesting that they are likely between an even year between the late 1940s and 1954.  The tractors are a IH Farmall H and a Farmall M.  I put in many hours on Farmall tractors during my younger days.  Click either image to go to the page with larger images.  Click the link to the Tractor page to see more plates from that era.  Thanks to Jason Cook for sharing these old photos.

 


1/23/2022 Posting

Bruce Bufalini reports the following new highs as of 1/16, Truck, ZTS-7098

And Official Use, 42143P/A, photos not available.

 


Could PA Consider Auctioning Vanity License Plates?  Larry Resnick shared a news article in which State Rep. John Lawrence of Chester County plans to introduce legislation to allow PennDOT to sell specialty plates with desirable alphanumeric combinations to the highest bidder.  Lawrence is proposing that PennDOT issue a specialty blue plate with gold characters and a border outlining the shape of the state. The agency or its contractor would auction certain popular alphanumeric configurations, with proceeds going to the state's motor license fund.  Sounds interesting, but I have not been impressed with anything from PennDOT for many years, especially with their "Family of Plates" obsession.  Link to Patch.com news article.

 


CORRECTION: This is one of those 'in between' plates, but it is a high in terms of plates still with the sticker well.  So it helps to narrow the transition point of the changeover from those with the sticker well to those without.  The lowest plate spotted with the map outline without the sticker well is K47-351K, nothing in between has been recorded so far.

 


Here is the first photo of a Let Freedom Ring personalized plate thanks to Richard Than.  We just featured one of these last week, noting how lackluster plate sales have been with fewer than 150 serial-numbered plates sold.  Larry Resnick points out that the Family of Plates design and lack of advertising have done little to create demand.

 


This is a personalized Delaware Valley Chapter of the BMW Car Club of America.  This one has the map outline.  First time seen on a vanity, but have been seen on recent serial numbered plates as well.  This organization's plate program dates back to 2011.  This plate photo is thanks to Jeff Lawson.

 


Here is a personalized Pennsylvania DUI Association (Team DUI) plate thanks to Bruce Bufalini.  It is also wearing its Pennsylvania winter coat.  We believe this plate to be personalized since the standard serial numbered plates run from 00001D/U to 00112D/U.

 


In addition to the 3 personalized plates above, click this week's vanity page to see the display of several more plates.  Other photos are from Arthur Levine, Bill Stephens and John Kerestes.

 


These don't belong to the same vehicle, but they are related.  On the far left is a registration card for a 1972 Checker Taxi.  If you recall, before 1977 a Taxi would receive a Bus registration with this Taxi being issued BA-24743 in this case.  The source of this card is unknown.  The Taxi plate, on the other hand, would have been issued late in the period of the 1977 through '83 issue, and were eligible for renewal up through the 2000 re-plating.  The plate photo is from Worthpoint.  The yellow on blue 1984 Taxi issue started at TX-25000. 

 

 

 


In the two grader photos we see a Pennsylvania Tractor plate.  Click either image to go to Older Plates In Use page.  The grader has CUMRU on the side indicating Cumru Township, Berks County.  The tractor plate reads 2827, and comparing it to the 1937 example shown here, I'm going out on a limb and suggest that the grader plate is also a 1937.    Then click image showing the steam tractor for a full size image. Interesting photo, it appears that the grader is cutting a new road.  The two grader photos are thanks to Jason Cook, while the 3859 came from Tim Gierschick.  More old tractor plates next week.

 


This is either a 1928 or 1932 T-Weight Class Truck plate in use.  The plate serial reads T11-660, but unfortunately the year is too tough to decipher.  The vehicle appears to be a Ford Model AA 1½ ton truck, possibly the year of the truck might be a clue, but since they were made starting in 1927 and going to 1932, it's hard to say.  Click the image to go to the Older Plates In Use page.  Thanks to Rob Baran for this image.  Check back next week for another old truck plate in use.

 

 


While looking into 1928 Truck plates, I discovered photos of three much needed plates that I had taken while visiting Bill Krellner a couple years ago, but never posted.  Sadly Bill passed away in October of 2020.  The 1928 truck plates shown here include a 15-inch T-Weight Class, a 13-inch U-Weight Class and a 15-inch W-Weight Class.  The 5 character W plate is wider due to the width of the W.  Still need V- and Y-Weight Class plate photos.

 


These 1948 Truck plates helped to fill some gaps.  The far left is an S-Weight Class.  That year the following formats were used: S000A, S00A0, S0A00, S00AA and S0AA0, with the plate shown here being part of S00A0.  The V Weight Class used V000A, V00A0 and V0A00, with the plate shown here being part of V00A0.  All plates measured 6" by 11".  Still need a Class R with a R0AA0 serial format.  These photos were from Worthpoint.

 


1/16/2022 Posting

This #68 Let Freedom Ring plate was recently received by Clayton Moore.  Previously he received #87.  For what it's worth, the low number on this series is 00051F/R, and the registered high is 00194F/R, as of 1/11.  So since 10/29/2020, 143 plates have been issued.  These plates were intended to commemorate our nation's 250 year or Semiquincentennial anniversary, much as Bicentennial plate did for 1976.

 


This Autism Society of America plate is thanks to John Clark.  This plate establishes a new high number with the sticker well.  We also know that A/U20499 no longer has the sticker well.  This plate also shows graying of the sheeting.

 


This new high Emergency Vehicle plate was recently spotted by Bruce Bufalini.  EV plates are part of a two-tiered system, with this plate being part of the upper tier.  That group generally represents volunteer fire and EMS groups, whereas the lower tier (EV-30000 to about EV-37270) are generally municipal or paid organizations.  In addition to those mentioned above, there is a whole host of vehicle uses that can qualify for EV plates.  These include: blood delivery vehicles; organ delivery; armed forces emergency; coroner & deputy coroner; haz-mat; emergency management; canteen support; even certain PA turnpike vehicles.  If you crave a more complete list, click this, MV-14EV (08-04).qxd (state.pa.us).

 


Check out these photos of a low number Blue Lodge vanity plate spotted by Jaska Börner.  Also click this week's vanity page to see the display of 8 new photos of vanities or personalized plates.  Other photos from H. Kelly, Mike Alfonse, Tee Adam and Arthur Levine.

 

 

 


In this week's installment of photos showing antique Tractor plates in use, we have another 1917 Tractor plate taken in Germania, PA, thanks to Jason Cook.  The actual date of the plate is too hard to read, but the serial number uses two different #2 dies.  This inconsistency was highlighted on the recent 1/2/22 posting and suggests that the plate is from 1917.  Click either image to go to Older Plates In Use page.  Then click image showing the steam tractor for a full size image.

 


Note the license plate shown on the far left and center is Tractor Dealer TX22, the year can't be read but the plate appears very similar to the 1924 Tractor Dealer TX24, shown for comparison.  Thanks to Jason Cook for this unusual snapshot of history.  Photo shows a Rumley Oil Pull Tractor in a strong man competition.  Sign to rear of tractor reads Harrisburg and Dauphin County Fair, East Harrisburg, September 17, 18.  Click either image to go to Older Plates In Use page.  Then click image showing the tractor with the strong man for a full size image.

 


This is a 1952 Y-Weight Class Truck plate.  1952 was the first year for truck plates to be issued as singles.  Plates measured 6 inches by 11 inches.  This photo came from Worthpoint, a service to which I have a subscription.  Still need a 1952 Truck Class R, R000A format, and a Class S, S000A format, if anyone can help.

 


Another needed image found.  This is a 1954 S-Weight Class Truck plate.  For 1954 plates measured 6 inches by 10¼ inches.  1954 S-weight Trucks used these five serial formats: S000A, S00A0, S0A00, S00AA, S0AA0, the plate shown here being part of S0AA0.  Still need a photo of an S000A format plate, as well as: U00AA, any W, and Y000A.

 


This is a 1987 Lady Keystone Open Golf Tournament special event plate.  This plate having no serial number would suggest it was a prototype or sample.  Such plates were made of cardboard or cardstock were valid for the period June 15 to 22, 1987.  The plate image is thanks to John Anshant.

 


This is a Pennsylvania International Air Show special event plate, also made of cardboard or cardstock.  It was valid for September 5 and 6, and expired on September 8 of 1987.  This plate having a serial number of 0 might suggest it was a prototype or sample.  The plate image is thanks to John Anshant.

 


1/9/2022 Posting

This is a new high Salvage Yard plate thanks to Preston Turner.  This is also the first plate documented with the map outline.  Preston asked if I knew the meaning of the WL prefix.  I do not.  PennDOT uses the term Vehicle Salvor Yard, which does not help.  Preston wondered if the term Wrecker License could explain the WL.  Anyone?

 


This appears to be the highest Dealer plate photographed, thanks to Jordan Irazabal.  It should be mentioned that back in September, Bruce Bufalini spotted K65-253K, just 53 plates higher, but was not able to snap a photo.  Out of curiosity, I checked the plate availability tool which indicated that the issued high is K67-551K as of 1/5.

 

 

 


The Arcadia University image on the far left from Jeff Lawson reminded me that my section displaying such plates looked a little neglected with only a single plate.  The only other unposted Arcadia image I had was the A/U00298 photo from Jordan Irazabal and Tom Perri, but that photo dates back to 2012 I think.  A little checking showed that their plate program is still active.  A record check indicates that A/U00343 is the current high.  This plate program is still using the www base.

 


Emergency Medical Services plates date back to 1985.  All of the original yellow on blue plates that were issued up to the changeover in 2001, were reissued on a number-for-number basis on the www base like the plate shown here.  This plate photo was provided by Jeff Lawson.

 

 


This is a new high Veteran plate which was recently spotted by Bruce Bufalini.  This plate series dates back to 2005 with a starting point of 00001U/S.  The vehicle must be owned or co-owned by a veteran or service member who served or is serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.  There is also a Veteran Motorcycle plate.  Not to be confused with those, there are also Honoring Our Veterans, Honoring Our Veterans (motorcycle) and Honoring Our Women Veterans plates which are all Special Fund plates, and do not require the plate holder to be a veteran.

 


Click this vanity page link to see this week's display of 8 new photos of vanities or personalized plates.  The vanity PD shown here is thanks to Tee Adams.  See others from Arthur Levine, Jerry McCoy, H. Kelly, and others from Tee Adams.

 


This is the start of a new feature with a page dedicated to old plates in actual use.  The thumbnail photos to the left show a 1917 Tractor plate in use on a Case tractor of the period.  Clicking these thumbnails will take you to the Older Plates In Use page where larger photos can be enlarged still more to the native resolution of the scanned images.    A big Thank You to Jason Cook for the tractor photos.  I will be adding additional Tractor photos in the coming weeks.  This new page also shows Older Truck Plates In Use.  Most of the truck photos came from elsewhere on this website.

 


Like the 1926 Y-Class Truck plate from last week, here are before and after photos of a 1936 V-Weight Class Truck plate thanks to Rob Baran.  Rob performed some cleaning and sanding.  Nice to see that there was still color underneath.

 

 


These are 1943 Truck Validation Tabs, as you may know they were issued in place of new plates for 1943, due to the war effort.  These tabs were to be mounted in the upper left hand bolt hole to cover up 42.  While the tabs above may look pretty much alike, they all represent a different weight class starting with R and progressing to Y, and then ZZ.  Click the thumbnail images to see the class and serial number stamped below the 3-31-44.  These are thanks to Rob Baran.  The last tab is actually a rare ZZ-weight class tab thanks to John Anshant.  I still need a Z-class tab photo.

 


This is a 1944 S-Weight Class Truck plate thanks again to Rob Baran.  For that year there were three S-Class serial progressions used, including S000A, S00A0, S0A00, with the plate shown here being part of the second group.  1944 is not an easy year.  Still need images for the following weight classes and formats: S0A00, T00A0, U000A, U0A00, any from class V, W and Y.

 


Here is another needed image that fills a gap, this one being a 1947 U-Weight Class Truck plate.  1947 had 4 U-Weight Class serial progressions including U000A, U00A0, U0A00, U00AA.  Still need plate images from the first two progressions.  I want to thank Rob Baran for all of his help with filling a number of gaps.

 


These are special event plates made of cardboard.  The far left is an Erie International Air Show from 1986.  The other plate is also an Erie International Air Show but from 1987.  That plate has no number, so possibly a prototype?  Thanks to John Anshant for the photos.

 


1/2/2022 Posting

Happy New Year!

Website Announcements

 > Most current plate type listings also provided a link to the 'current high', which took you to an external website where highs were tracked.  That website is no longer in operation.  I have removed most, if not all, of these external links.  Concerning highs, I am happy to post highs preferably with photos, but I don't have the time or resources to actually track them.  Another good resource for highs is the ALPCA Archives, which requires membership.

 > Beginning with the 1/9 update, a new page will be added showing older plates in use.  Initially it will feature Tractor and Truck plates.

 


This low-number American Motorcyclist Association plate dates back to 2003, the start of their plate program.  This AMA plate has never been updated to the visitPA base and color graphic.  The documented high is A/M00516, while plate check shows the registered high at A/M00539.  Thanks to Matt Ciecka for the photo.

 

 


This is a new high Northampton Fire Department plate which was recently spotted by Jaska Börner.  This plate program made its debut in 2015.  Plate check indicates that the registered high is 10015N/F.  Can't say unequivocally, but this plate does not appear to have a sticker well while 10013N/F does.

 


Here is another high, this Taxi plate was recently spotted by Jaska Börner.  The serial number reads TX-50711.  Based on other over 50000 numbered plates, this plate likely still has the sticker well. 

 

 


This Expeditionary Forces Veteran photo was provided by Zachary Bent.  This plate type dates back to 1995 and has gone through a number of iterations.  Click the link above to see a breakdown of the variations.  The starting point of this plate was E/F0001, and the current documented high is E/F3317.

 


This DA-MOZER photo was provided by Arthur Levine.  Not sure what's going on with the yellow band along the bottom of the plate.   Click the vanity page link to see this week's display.  Each week I post about 8 new photos of personalized plates.

 

 

 

 

 


The far left is a Civil Defense plate from Perry County as indicated by the 50 prefix.  The credential is a Motor Vehicle Civil Defense Plate Identification Card also from Perry County.  While they may be from the same county, the card corresponds to a different plate.  The card is the first credential I've seen to connect the plate to the vehicle on which the plate was used.  The card corresponds to plate 50-060, and was issued on 2/24/77.  These images are from Worthpoint.  Does anyone know the exact years when blue on yellow and yellow on blue CD plates were issued?

 


Recently there was a discussion on Facebook about the inconsistent use of serial dies on some 1917 plates.  This matter was brought up thanks to Jason Cook with input from Guillaume Joseph, Clayton Moore and Robby Crowder.  Note the far left pair has two versions of the number 2 on each plate.  The center pair shows number 2 variations between the upper and lower plates.  The 233644 plate uses two different 4s where the openings in the center of the 4s are different sizes.  The far left photo is from Worthpoint, the center photo is thanks to Robby Crowder, the right photo is from Worthpoint.  These die inconsistencies can be seen on some tractor plates, and possibly other 1917 plate types.  See more variations below.

 


There appears to be 2 different letter S dies used on these 1917 1-Star Truck plates.   The far left plate is thanks to Jeff Hinkle, the near left plate is from eBay user 51jnj61.

 

 


PART 1: This 1926 Y-Weight Class Truck plate is a little rough, but also very rare.  The serial number reads Y-202.  This plate was on eBay and was brought to my attention by Eric Tanner.  I reached out to the plate owner, Pickersemporium01, who gave me the OK to use the image.  In the mean time, the plate was bought by Rob Baran.   To my knowledge this is the only 1926 Y Truck plate documented.  Early Y-, Z-, and double letter class truck plates are almost always a challenge to find.

PART 2: Rob received the plate, and here is how it looks after some sanding and cleaning.  Click image to enlarge.  He feels it may be a candidate for sandblasting and repainting, but for now he's happy to have such a rare plate.

 

 


This is the first image of a 1940 Y-Weight Class Truck plate.  Thanks to Rob Baran for this hard to find plate image.  The only serial progression for Y-class plates was Y000A, as seen in the photo.  All plates measured 6 inches by 12 inches, and were issued in pairs.

 

 


 

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